Jobs

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Lani
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Re: Jobs

Post #326 by Lani » Wed Mar 15, 2017 5:35 am

Probably the wrong place to post this, but I couldn't find a thread on magically creating jobs for miners. Perhaps there is a glimmer (grimace?) of hope! Just get rid of safety regulations!

State safety inspectors wouldn’t inspect West Virginia’s coal mines anymore. They would conduct “compliance visits and education.”

Violations of health and safety standards wouldn’t produce state citations and fines, either. Mine operators would receive “compliance assistance visit notices.”

And West Virginia regulators wouldn’t have authority to write safety and health regulations. Instead, they could only “adopt policies ... [for] improving compliance assistance” in the state’s mines.

Those and other significant changes in a new industry-backed bill would produce a wholesale elimination of most enforcement of longstanding laws and rules put in place over many years — as a result of hundreds of deaths — to protect the health and safety of West Virginia’s coal miners.

http://www.wvgazettemail.com/news-polit ... 23RkB.dpuf


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Re: Jobs

Post #327 by Volkonski » Sat Mar 18, 2017 9:58 pm

Wages rise on California farms. Americans still don’t want the job

http://www.latimes.com/projects/la-fi-f ... migration/

Farmers are being forced to make difficult choices about whether to abandon some of the state’s hallmark fruits and vegetables, move operations abroad, import workers under a special visa or replace them altogether with machines.

Growers who can afford it have already begun raising worker pay well beyond minimum wage. Wages for crop production in California increased by 13% from 2010 to 2015, twice as fast as average pay in the state, according to a Los Angeles Times analysis of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

:snippity:

But the raises and new perks have not tempted native-born Americans to leave their day jobs for the fields. Nine in 10 agriculture workers in California are still foreign born, and more than half are undocumented, according to a federal survey.

Instead, companies growing high-value crops, like Cabernet Sauvignon grapes in Napa, are luring employees from fields in places like Stockton that produce cheaper wine grapes or less profitable fruits and vegetables.


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Re: Jobs

Post #328 by kate520 » Sat Mar 18, 2017 10:46 pm

My baby brother had a friend growing up whose family owned farms in the San Joaquin Valley. Dad made sure his kids knew how to work hard, as hard as,the migrants. They spent one month every summer picking tomatoes. My brother went three years. Back breaking, sun burning, dehydrating work.


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Re: Jobs

Post #329 by Foggy » Sun Mar 19, 2017 5:57 am

Humph. Our main crop will kill you AFTER bein' harvested, and the farm kids who worked in the back-breaking, hot, steamy fields bringing it in didden have no stinkin' undockymented immigrunts to help none. Them old-timey terbacco farmers are a tough breed.


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Re: Jobs

Post #330 by Chilidog » Sun Mar 19, 2017 12:36 pm

kate520 wrote:My baby brother had a friend growing up whose family owned farms in the San Joaquin Valley. Dad made sure his kids knew how to work hard, as hard as,the migrants. They spent one month every summer picking tomatoes. My brother went three years. Back breaking, sun burning, dehydrating work.


http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2017/m ... ng-child-/
U.S. Sen. Jim Risch wants to relax child labor laws to allow 16-year-olds to run logging equipment under parental supervision in family-owned businesses.

The Idaho Republican has made several prior runs at changing the law, which currently requires individuals to be 18 or older to work in logging or forestry. This year, he’s teamed up with Sen. Angus King of Maine on legislation they’re calling the “Future Logging Careers Act.”

“Family business is a way of life in the logging industry,” Risch said in a statement. “By allowing young adults to begin helping their parents (operate machinery) at an earlier age, we can bolster the entire logging industry.”

The aging of loggers and challenges in attracting younger workers to jobs in the woods are industry concerns. According to a 2005 University of Idaho study, nearly two-thirds of all loggers in the Inland Northwest are 40 or older. Their bosses, logging contractors, were in their 50s.


I don't think that's going to turn out well.



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Re: Jobs

Post #331 by SueDB » Sun Mar 19, 2017 12:56 pm

Chilidog wrote:
kate520 wrote:My baby brother had a friend growing up whose family owned farms in the San Joaquin Valley. Dad made sure his kids knew how to work hard, as hard as,the migrants. They spent one month every summer picking tomatoes. My brother went three years. Back breaking, sun burning, dehydrating work.


http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2017/m ... ng-child-/
U.S. Sen. Jim Risch wants to relax child labor laws to allow 16-year-olds to run logging equipment under parental supervision in family-owned businesses.

The Idaho Republican has made several prior runs at changing the law, which currently requires individuals to be 18 or older to work in logging or forestry. This year, he’s teamed up with Sen. Angus King of Maine on legislation they’re calling the “Future Logging Careers Act.”

“Family business is a way of life in the logging industry,” Risch said in a statement. “By allowing young adults to begin helping their parents (operate machinery) at an earlier age, we can bolster the entire logging industry.”

The aging of loggers and challenges in attracting younger workers to jobs in the woods are industry concerns. According to a 2005 University of Idaho study, nearly two-thirds of all loggers in the Inland Northwest are 40 or older. Their bosses, logging contractors, were in their 50s.


I don't think that's going to turn out well.


Anything to do with the dwindling logging industry (besides the big money folks - Port Blakely etc) is not going to end well. The kids deserve a better future than a life of continuing injury.


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Re: Jobs

Post #332 by gupwalla » Sun Mar 19, 2017 2:21 pm

Foggy wrote:Humph. Our main crop will kill you AFTER bein' harvested, and the farm kids who worked in the back-breaking, hot, steamy fields bringing it in didden have no stinkin' undockymented immigrunts to help none. Them old-timey terbacco farmers are a tough breed.


The tobacco industry is the largest, beneficiary of H-2A temporary agriculture visas (and by state, North Carolina is consistently among the largest beneficiaries). That is a form of documentation, so you are not incorrect - just a wee bit misleading perhaps. Either those strapping NC farm kids don't want to do the hot, steamy, back-breaking work of cultivating cancer even at the relatively lucrative wage of $11.27/hour (the minimum wage for H-2A labor in NC) or there aren't enough of them.

I'm sure that there are exactly zero North Carolina farmers who situationally ignore immigration laws and hire undocumented workers at substantially less than $11.27/hour if they calculate they can get away with it. That would be illegal.

But no worries, The Great Wall of Chinless will restore all those jobs to Americans, just like in the olden days. Well, the more recent olden days anyway, not the olden days just before that when immigrant labor harvested the tobacco and got paid in lashes instead of money.


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Re: Jobs

Post #333 by Foggy » Sun Mar 19, 2017 6:08 pm

I wuz talking about people my age who harvested tobacco before hardly any immigrants, legal or undocumented, came to the Old North State. But I realize the situation has changed since then. A Cuban buddy of mine in Collie Fornya told me, when I informed him that we were moving here, that North Cackilacki is one of the top 10 best states for Hispanics to live.


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Re: Jobs

Post #334 by Sugar Magnolia » Mon Mar 20, 2017 5:52 am

Chilidog wrote:http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2017/mar/17/idaho-senator-makes-another-run-at-relaxing-child-/
U.S. Sen. Jim Risch wants to relax child labor laws to allow 16-year-olds to run logging equipment under parental supervision in family-owned businesses.

“Family business is a way of life in the logging industry,” Risch said in a statement. “By allowing young adults to begin helping their parents (operate machinery) at an earlier age, we can bolster the entire logging industry.”



I don't think that's going to turn out well.


So this law would only apply to family-owned businesses with children between the ages of 16-18 and they expect it to "bolster the entire logging industry"? Such tight restrictions on who it affects seems to me like they're limiting their options a good bit. Why not lower the age to 12 and draw in many more kids to help "bolster the entire logging industry"? They just aren't thinking big enough.



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Re: Jobs

Post #335 by Chilidog » Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:29 am

12 year olds are too sticky. They tend to gum up the chippers.



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Re: Jobs

Post #336 by tek » Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:36 am

Chilidog wrote:12 year olds are too sticky. They tend to gum up the chippers.


That can't be the reason, too much science.



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Re: Jobs

Post #337 by RVInit » Mon Mar 20, 2017 8:02 am

tek wrote:
Chilidog wrote:12 year olds are too sticky. They tend to gum up the chippers.


That can't be the reason, too much science.

:rotflmao:


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Re: Jobs

Post #338 by Tiredretiredlawyer » Mon Mar 20, 2017 10:16 am

Chilidog wrote:12 year olds are too sticky. They tend to gum up the chippers.

Chili!!!!! EWWWWWWW! :o


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Re: Jobs

Post #339 by Lani » Thu Mar 23, 2017 8:34 am

Thousands of mall-based stores are shutting down in what's fast becoming one of the biggest waves of retail closures in decades.

More than 3,500 stores are expected to close in the next couple of months.

Department stores like JCPenney, Macy's, Sears, and Kmart are among the companies shutting down stores, along with middle-of-the-mall chains like Crocs, BCBG, Abercrombie & Fitch, and Guess.

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-reta ... ica-2017-3

BCBG has filed for bankruptcy. Sears is on the ropes. CVS is closing stores and anticipating further losses when the ACA is repealed.


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Re: Jobs

Post #340 by RVInit » Thu Mar 23, 2017 8:57 am

Gosh, I bet the number of people who are losing their jobs pretty well outpaces the roughly 700 jobs "saved" at Carrier.


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Re: Jobs

Post #341 by Volkonski » Sun Mar 26, 2017 11:02 am

Robots could take over 38% of U.S. jobs within about 15 years, report says

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-p ... story.html

The analysis, by accounting and consulting firm PwC, emphasized that its estimates are based on the anticipated capabilities of robotics and artificial intelligence, and that the pace and direction of technological progress are “uncertain.”

It said that in the U.S., 38% of jobs could be at risk of automation, compared with 30% in Britain, 35% in Germany and 21% in Japan.

The main reason is not that the U.S. has more jobs in sectors that are universally ripe for automation, the report says; rather, it’s that more U.S. jobs in certain sectors are potentially vulnerable than, say, British jobs in the same sectors.

For example, the report says the financial and insurance sector has much higher possibility of automation in the U.S. than in Britain. That’s because, it says, American finance workers are less educated than British ones.


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Re: Jobs

Post #342 by Volkonski » Mon Mar 27, 2017 12:28 pm

Trump is ready to let coal users pollute more. No matter what he does about that there remain many reasons why coal jobs are not coming back.

More coal jobs aren't the way to the future

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/opinion ... 026759.php

America's coal industry is sinking sadly. Tonnage, usually above 1 billion, dropped to 749 million tons in 2016. Employment, which exceeded 800,000 in the 1920s, has fallen below 66,000. Four large mining corporations went bankrupt in the past couple of years.

:snippity:

In the 1970s, longwall machines could produce 10 times as much coal with half as many workers. And more jobs vanished because mining switched to huge surface pits, where monster machines and explosives do the work. The number of West Virginia miners continued falling - to the 30,000s in the 1990s, then below 20,000 in the new 21st century. Official state figures put today's total around 12,000. The number of operating mines fell drastically.

Most of the decline happened because rich, thick seams in the Central Appalachian Basin - largely southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky - gradually became exhausted. Only thinner, difficult-to-mine coal remains. The slump worsened when horizontal drilling and hydraulic "fracking" loosed a flood of cheaper natural gas that grabbed coal markets.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration says Central Appalachian yearly coal production dropped from 235 million tons in 2008 to below 60 million today - and is forecast below 40 million by 2040. That much loss is stunning.


Note that 98% of coal is used for electric power generation. It is hard to reduce the costs of using coal just by easing environmental regulations. To begin with 25% of the cost of coal to utility companies is for transportation of the coal from mines to power plants. Trains are expensive compared to pipelines. Coal piles must be constantly managed by skilled workers. Gas tanks not so much. Coal must be pulverized before it is fed into boilers. Gas can be used in turbines directly as it is received. Coal ash must be disposed of. Gas turbine exhaust blows away in the wind.

As long as gas prices are even close to being comparable to coal, coal use will decline.


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Re: Jobs

Post #343 by NMgirl » Mon Mar 27, 2017 2:58 pm

Related to Volkonski's posting above is this podcast/article by NPR:
http://www.npr.org/2017/03/01/517031278 ... d-power-pl

"The Navajo Nation has relied on the coal industry for the last four decades. The energy companies have provided hundreds of families with some of the best-paying jobs on the reservation. The revenue, taxes and royalties all make up about a third of the tribe's operating budget.

The Salt River Project, the plant operator, says natural gas is much cheaper and makes more economic sense. A plant closure means the coal mine that feeds the plant would also likely shut down. Together, the Navajo Generating Station and the mine that feeds the plant employ about 800 people."

The NPR piece speaks of the loss of jobs for the Navajo Nation, but the Hopi reservation, which is a small reservation entirely inside the Big Rez, will suffer just as much, if not more, than the Navajo Nation. The Hopi tribe is traditionally non confrontational, losing out to the aggressive Navajo Nation time and time again, and the Hopis are under greater strain economically than the Navajos.

"NGS and Kayenta Mine, which provides coal to the power plant, provide significant revenue and many jobs for both tribes. Combined revenues from both operations provide more than 80-percent of the Hopi Tribe’s general fund budget." https://www.nhonews.com/news/2017/feb/0 ... here-stay/

I'm in no way saying that coal shouldn't be eliminated, but the impact on both the Navajo Nation and the Hopi is likely to be devastating. Retraining for different jobs is doubly, triply difficult when the affected populations live so far distant from any likely future jobs, perhaps a hundred miles or more.
navajo-map.jpg
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Re: Jobs

Post #344 by Volkonski » Tue Mar 28, 2017 2:26 pm

A look at how Trump’s moves on coal will affect the industry

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business ... 327f1a3a56

Coal’s share of the U.S. power market has dwindled from more than 50 percent last decade to about 32 percent last year. Gas and renewables have both made gains, and hundreds of coal-burning power plants have been retired or are scheduled to shutter soontrends over which Trump has limited influence.

Utilities “are not going to flip on a dime and say now it’s time to start building a whole bunch of coal plants because there’s a Trump administration,” said Brian Murray, director of environmental economics at Duke University’s Nicholas Institute.


Those expecting new jobs in coal will be disappointed.

By the way, here in fossil fuel loving Texas 20% of the grid electricity now comes from wind power. That is up from 12% in 2015 and 15% in 2016. Texas has 18,000 megawatts of wind turbine capacity installed and another 5,000 megawatts under construction. That's the future. Trump is mired in the past.


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Re: Jobs

Post #345 by tek » Tue Mar 28, 2017 2:45 pm

reported various places yesterday
Murray Energy CEO Robert Murray said though he’s encouraged by President Donald Trump’s assault on what he called fraudulent green legislation, he doubts many mining jobs will be coming back.

[...]

Murray said he told the president to “temper his expectations” when it comes to restoring mining industry jobs, however, because many of them were lost to technology, not regulation.

“He can’t bring them back,” Murray said.


Glad DJT is wasting our time lining the pockets of the mine owners and not actually creating jobs.. Winning!



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Re: Jobs

Post #346 by RVInit » Tue Mar 28, 2017 3:34 pm

tek wrote:reported various places yesterday
Murray Energy CEO Robert Murray said though he’s encouraged by President Donald Trump’s assault on what he called fraudulent green legislation, he doubts many mining jobs will be coming back.

[...]

Murray said he told the president to “temper his expectations” when it comes to restoring mining industry jobs, however, because many of them were lost to technology, not regulation.

“He can’t bring them back,” Murray said.


Glad DJT is wasting our time lining the pockets of the mine owners and not actually creating jobs.. Winning!


And destroying the environment to boot. Which will cost taxpayers even more money for the inevitable clean up that will have to be done.


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Re: Jobs

Post #347 by Volkonski » Wed Mar 29, 2017 11:02 am

Trump promised to bring back coal jobs. That promise ‘will not be kept,’ experts say.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/ene ... b04b804122

But industry experts say coal mining jobs will continue to be lost, not because of blocked access to coal, but because power plant owners are turning to natural gas. At least six plants that relied on coal have closed or announced they will close since Trump’s victory in November, including the main plant at the Navajo Generating Station in Arizona, the largest in the West. Another 40 are projected to close during the president’s four-year term.

As power companies switch fuels, “the amount of coal in the national energy generation mix (both Fuels and Electricity Generation) has declined by 53 percent since 2006,” according to a Department of Energy report released in January. Over the same period, electricity generation from natural gas increased 33 percent.

:snippity:

The IEEFA disagreed. “Promises to create more coal jobs will not be kept — indeed the industry will continue to cut payrolls,” the group said in its 2017 U.S. Coal Outlook. “These losses will be related in part to the coal industry’s long-term business model of producing more coal with fewer workers.”

The industry has a fundamental problem it has not addressed even as businesses fail, the IEEFA said: “Too many companies are still mining too much coal for too few customers.”


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Re: Jobs

Post #348 by RTH10260 » Fri Mar 31, 2017 12:05 am




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Re: Jobs

Post #349 by Volkonski » Mon Apr 03, 2017 12:55 pm

Meanwhile on the North Fork-

Local farmers sound alarm to congressman: We don’t have enough workers

http://riverheadlocal.com/2017/04/02/lo ... h-workers/

“The big elephant in the room is labor,” Jim Glover of Glover Perennials in Cutchogue told Rep. Lee Zeldin. “Labor is the biggest issue thwarting all of our efforts to do business in our industry,” he said.

“I don’t have enough help for my business.” Glover worries his business may not be sustainable and thoughts of expanding are out of the question.

The Cutchogue grower’s concerns were echoed by many of the men and women gathered at the farm bureau’s Calverton office for the group’s annual “breakfast with the congressman.” The breakfast has been a rite of spring for years — and for years farmers and growers who attend have voiced their concerns about the labor supply.

:snippity:

Zeldin said there are not enough votes in either the House or Senate to pass a comprehensive reform bill. The solution, as he sees it, is to first address “border security and interior enforcement.” Once legislators believe those two things have been adequately addressed, Congress can then turn to other aspects of the thorny and highly charged issue — one area at a time.


During the election Zeldin was a Trump supporter. Now he finds himself blamed for potential reductions in Federal funding to clean up the Peconic Estuary, Obamacare repeal and farm labor shortages.


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Re: Jobs

Post #350 by DejaMoo » Mon Apr 03, 2017 1:31 pm

SueDB wrote:http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2017/m ... ng-child-/
U.S. Sen. Jim Risch wants to relax child labor laws to allow 16-year-olds to run logging equipment under parental supervision in family-owned businesses.


Minnesota State Senator Paul Anderson has introduced the Youth Skills Training Act that would provide money for businesses to set up manufacturing skills training programs for 16-18 year old high school students. These programs would be administered by school districts, kids and their parents would sign a waiver that they'll be engaging in hazardous work, and the bill would provide an exemption to the child labor laws prohibiting minors from operating hazardous machinery.

More corporate welfare, with any potential liability shifted to the school districts who'll be responsible for running the programs.

There's no explanation why these companies can't ask their local technical colleges to start training programs for legal adults, or why the companies themselves don't provide educational incentives in the form of paying for such training programs for potential employees. I remember back in the day it was pretty routine for employers to pay for skills training.




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