Jobs

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Lani
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Re: Jobs

Post #326 by Lani » Wed Mar 15, 2017 5:35 am

Probably the wrong place to post this, but I couldn't find a thread on magically creating jobs for miners. Perhaps there is a glimmer (grimace?) of hope! Just get rid of safety regulations!

State safety inspectors wouldn’t inspect West Virginia’s coal mines anymore. They would conduct “compliance visits and education.”

Violations of health and safety standards wouldn’t produce state citations and fines, either. Mine operators would receive “compliance assistance visit notices.”

And West Virginia regulators wouldn’t have authority to write safety and health regulations. Instead, they could only “adopt policies ... [for] improving compliance assistance” in the state’s mines.

Those and other significant changes in a new industry-backed bill would produce a wholesale elimination of most enforcement of longstanding laws and rules put in place over many years — as a result of hundreds of deaths — to protect the health and safety of West Virginia’s coal miners.

http://www.wvgazettemail.com/news-polit ... 23RkB.dpuf


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Volkonski
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Re: Jobs

Post #327 by Volkonski » Sat Mar 18, 2017 9:58 pm

Wages rise on California farms. Americans still don’t want the job

http://www.latimes.com/projects/la-fi-f ... migration/

Farmers are being forced to make difficult choices about whether to abandon some of the state’s hallmark fruits and vegetables, move operations abroad, import workers under a special visa or replace them altogether with machines.

Growers who can afford it have already begun raising worker pay well beyond minimum wage. Wages for crop production in California increased by 13% from 2010 to 2015, twice as fast as average pay in the state, according to a Los Angeles Times analysis of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

:snippity:

But the raises and new perks have not tempted native-born Americans to leave their day jobs for the fields. Nine in 10 agriculture workers in California are still foreign born, and more than half are undocumented, according to a federal survey.

Instead, companies growing high-value crops, like Cabernet Sauvignon grapes in Napa, are luring employees from fields in places like Stockton that produce cheaper wine grapes or less profitable fruits and vegetables.


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
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kate520
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Re: Jobs

Post #328 by kate520 » Sat Mar 18, 2017 10:46 pm

My baby brother had a friend growing up whose family owned farms in the San Joaquin Valley. Dad made sure his kids knew how to work hard, as hard as,the migrants. They spent one month every summer picking tomatoes. My brother went three years. Back breaking, sun burning, dehydrating work.


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Foggy
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Re: Jobs

Post #329 by Foggy » Sun Mar 19, 2017 5:57 am

Humph. Our main crop will kill you AFTER bein' harvested, and the farm kids who worked in the back-breaking, hot, steamy fields bringing it in didden have no stinkin' undockymented immigrunts to help none. Them old-timey terbacco farmers are a tough breed.


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Chilidog
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Re: Jobs

Post #330 by Chilidog » Sun Mar 19, 2017 12:36 pm

kate520 wrote:My baby brother had a friend growing up whose family owned farms in the San Joaquin Valley. Dad made sure his kids knew how to work hard, as hard as,the migrants. They spent one month every summer picking tomatoes. My brother went three years. Back breaking, sun burning, dehydrating work.


http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2017/m ... ng-child-/
U.S. Sen. Jim Risch wants to relax child labor laws to allow 16-year-olds to run logging equipment under parental supervision in family-owned businesses.

The Idaho Republican has made several prior runs at changing the law, which currently requires individuals to be 18 or older to work in logging or forestry. This year, he’s teamed up with Sen. Angus King of Maine on legislation they’re calling the “Future Logging Careers Act.”

“Family business is a way of life in the logging industry,” Risch said in a statement. “By allowing young adults to begin helping their parents (operate machinery) at an earlier age, we can bolster the entire logging industry.”

The aging of loggers and challenges in attracting younger workers to jobs in the woods are industry concerns. According to a 2005 University of Idaho study, nearly two-thirds of all loggers in the Inland Northwest are 40 or older. Their bosses, logging contractors, were in their 50s.


I don't think that's going to turn out well.



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SueDB
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Re: Jobs

Post #331 by SueDB » Sun Mar 19, 2017 12:56 pm

Chilidog wrote:
kate520 wrote:My baby brother had a friend growing up whose family owned farms in the San Joaquin Valley. Dad made sure his kids knew how to work hard, as hard as,the migrants. They spent one month every summer picking tomatoes. My brother went three years. Back breaking, sun burning, dehydrating work.


http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2017/m ... ng-child-/
U.S. Sen. Jim Risch wants to relax child labor laws to allow 16-year-olds to run logging equipment under parental supervision in family-owned businesses.

The Idaho Republican has made several prior runs at changing the law, which currently requires individuals to be 18 or older to work in logging or forestry. This year, he’s teamed up with Sen. Angus King of Maine on legislation they’re calling the “Future Logging Careers Act.”

“Family business is a way of life in the logging industry,” Risch said in a statement. “By allowing young adults to begin helping their parents (operate machinery) at an earlier age, we can bolster the entire logging industry.”

The aging of loggers and challenges in attracting younger workers to jobs in the woods are industry concerns. According to a 2005 University of Idaho study, nearly two-thirds of all loggers in the Inland Northwest are 40 or older. Their bosses, logging contractors, were in their 50s.


I don't think that's going to turn out well.


Anything to do with the dwindling logging industry (besides the big money folks - Port Blakely etc) is not going to end well. The kids deserve a better future than a life of continuing injury.


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gupwalla
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Re: Jobs

Post #332 by gupwalla » Sun Mar 19, 2017 2:21 pm

Foggy wrote:Humph. Our main crop will kill you AFTER bein' harvested, and the farm kids who worked in the back-breaking, hot, steamy fields bringing it in didden have no stinkin' undockymented immigrunts to help none. Them old-timey terbacco farmers are a tough breed.


The tobacco industry is the largest, beneficiary of H-2A temporary agriculture visas (and by state, North Carolina is consistently among the largest beneficiaries). That is a form of documentation, so you are not incorrect - just a wee bit misleading perhaps. Either those strapping NC farm kids don't want to do the hot, steamy, back-breaking work of cultivating cancer even at the relatively lucrative wage of $11.27/hour (the minimum wage for H-2A labor in NC) or there aren't enough of them.

I'm sure that there are exactly zero North Carolina farmers who situationally ignore immigration laws and hire undocumented workers at substantially less than $11.27/hour if they calculate they can get away with it. That would be illegal.

But no worries, The Great Wall of Chinless will restore all those jobs to Americans, just like in the olden days. Well, the more recent olden days anyway, not the olden days just before that when immigrant labor harvested the tobacco and got paid in lashes instead of money.


Alea iacta est.

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Foggy
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Re: Jobs

Post #333 by Foggy » Sun Mar 19, 2017 6:08 pm

I wuz talking about people my age who harvested tobacco before hardly any immigrants, legal or undocumented, came to the Old North State. But I realize the situation has changed since then. A Cuban buddy of mine in Collie Fornya told me, when I informed him that we were moving here, that North Cackilacki is one of the top 10 best states for Hispanics to live.


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Sugar Magnolia
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Re: Jobs

Post #334 by Sugar Magnolia » Mon Mar 20, 2017 5:52 am

Chilidog wrote:http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2017/mar/17/idaho-senator-makes-another-run-at-relaxing-child-/
U.S. Sen. Jim Risch wants to relax child labor laws to allow 16-year-olds to run logging equipment under parental supervision in family-owned businesses.

“Family business is a way of life in the logging industry,” Risch said in a statement. “By allowing young adults to begin helping their parents (operate machinery) at an earlier age, we can bolster the entire logging industry.”



I don't think that's going to turn out well.


So this law would only apply to family-owned businesses with children between the ages of 16-18 and they expect it to "bolster the entire logging industry"? Such tight restrictions on who it affects seems to me like they're limiting their options a good bit. Why not lower the age to 12 and draw in many more kids to help "bolster the entire logging industry"? They just aren't thinking big enough.



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Chilidog
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Re: Jobs

Post #335 by Chilidog » Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:29 am

12 year olds are too sticky. They tend to gum up the chippers.



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tek
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Re: Jobs

Post #336 by tek » Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:36 am

Chilidog wrote:12 year olds are too sticky. They tend to gum up the chippers.


That can't be the reason, too much science.



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RVInit
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Re: Jobs

Post #337 by RVInit » Mon Mar 20, 2017 8:02 am

tek wrote:
Chilidog wrote:12 year olds are too sticky. They tend to gum up the chippers.


That can't be the reason, too much science.

:rotflmao:


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Tiredretiredlawyer
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Re: Jobs

Post #338 by Tiredretiredlawyer » Mon Mar 20, 2017 10:16 am

Chilidog wrote:12 year olds are too sticky. They tend to gum up the chippers.

Chili!!!!! EWWWWWWW! :o


“I’ve been hooked since my first smell of C-4.” Linda Cox, first female Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician, first to lead her own unit, go to war, be awarded a Bronze Star, and hold the highest enlisted rank of chief master sergeant.


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