Bye bye wind, we want coal

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ZekeB
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#101

Post by ZekeB »

Danraft wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:50 am
I skimmed through the sections on really cold winters as the efficiency ratings for the heat pumps are only relevant down to 10F.

From what I saw, it is best practice to protect from snow accumulation and to control air flow around the exterior unit for very cold climates.
In any case, in colder climates there are options to have a heating coil in the interior unit.
This is true, but the heating coils are electric. Instant megabuck increase in costs per therm. I had a heat pump years ago and it worked fine down to about 32F. When lower than that the pump and circulating fan kept running. The blower running and blowing essentially room temperature air caused a draft in the house. Heat pumps are fine if you're south of the good old Mason Dixon or if you use a ground well for warming the evaporator, but otherwise, nah.
Trump: Er hat eine größere Ente als ich.

Putin: Du bist kleiner als ich.

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Danraft
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#102

Post by Danraft »

We're in a tiny house with propane heat but the floor, just off ledge (so no basement or crawl space) has no insulation & other then tearing up all the floors, there's been no suggestions as to how to insulate them. We run solid insulation + black plastic around the cobblestone foundation in the late fall as a wind-break & that helps but when the temp goes below 20, things can get a bit chilly - & that 4 weeks-ish of -20° was BRUTAL so I'm wondering how the split systems do with that & how all of this works. And do they work when the electricity goes out? Not that we're in the market for anything right now.
Don't want to thread hijack and we're off topic.
If you have some images of the the home exterior, I'm not clear on what the home foundation/flooring situation is... message me. I may have some suggestions you could consider.
Dan
The Mercury Project

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vic
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#103

Post by vic »

TollandRCR wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 1:35 pm
When we had 11 days without electricity after a Halloween snow storm, the Mitsubishi system was dead, dead, dead! All the cats and I had was the propane range and a fireplace designed to have a fan. They had fur except for the Thai-origin Korat. He just had snuggling. There is something to be said for heating systems that are free of electricity.
My first job sent me from Los Angeles to Cape Cod for 18 months. During that time, there was a hurricane coming, and the AF Station where I worked was going to lock down so all the civilians were sent home. We were told that electricity would probably fail, so on the way home, I stopped and bought some large flashlights. A co-worker, also from L.A., knew that my cottage was all-electric, and suggested I stay with his family until the storm was over. Only later did we realize that since his home used oil for heating, it also required electricity to work.

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RTH10260
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#104

Post by RTH10260 »


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tek
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#105

Post by tek »

"U.S. clean coal program fails to deliver on promised smog cuts"

https://www.reuters.com/investigates/sp ... pollution/
In nearly three years of burning the treated coal, the Duke power plants collected several million dollars in federal subsidies. But the plants also pumped out more NOx, not less, according to data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency analyzed by Reuters.

The NOx emission rate at Duke’s Marshall Steam Station power plant in Sherrills Ford, North Carolina, for example, was between 33 percent and 76 percent higher in the three years from 2012 to 2014 than in 2011, the year before Marshall started burning refined coal, the EPA data shows.

The utility also discovered that one of the chemicals used to refine the coal, calcium bromide, had reached a nearby river and lakes – raising levels of carcinogens in the water supply for more than a million people in greater Charlotte.
There's no way back
from there to here

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HilltownGrrl
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#106

Post by HilltownGrrl »

tek wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 7:27 am
"U.S. clean coal program fails to deliver on promised smog cuts"

https://www.reuters.com/investigates/sp ... pollution/
In nearly three years of burning the treated coal, the Duke power plants collected several million dollars in federal subsidies. But the plants also pumped out more NOx, not less, according to data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency analyzed by Reuters.

The NOx emission rate at Duke’s Marshall Steam Station power plant in Sherrills Ford, North Carolina, for example, was between 33 percent and 76 percent higher in the three years from 2012 to 2014 than in 2011, the year before Marshall started burning refined coal, the EPA data shows.

The utility also discovered that one of the chemicals used to refine the coal, calcium bromide, had reached a nearby river and lakes – raising levels of carcinogens in the water supply for more than a million people in greater Charlotte.
Gee, what a surprise. No one could have known etc etc :roll:
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RTH10260
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#107

Post by RTH10260 »

Kentucky Miners Are Blocking a Coal Train for Back Pay. We Talked to One About a Just Transition.
BY SARAH LAZARE

(WYMT/screen shot)

On July 29, coal miners in Cumberland, Kentucky began blocking a train carrying more than $1 million worth of coal to protest their former employer, Blackjewel LLC, which declared bankruptcy on July 1. According to CNN, the company wrote bad checks to 350 miners in Harlan County alone, prompting the workers to stage the protest to demand their paychecks. Holding signs that say, “No pay, we stay,” the coal miners have been buoyed by community support, with churches and restaurants donating food and supplies. They say they will stay on the tracks until they get the wages they’re owed for the work they’ve already done. While Harlan County stands as the site of militant coal-miner labor struggles in the 1930s and 1970s, these workers are non-union.


https://inthesetimes.com/working/entry/ ... transition

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tek
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#108

Post by tek »

not exactly sure where to put this.. it's from a few months ago..

How one small city sowed the seeds for its own Green New Deal
There's no way back
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RTH10260
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#109

Post by RTH10260 »


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AndyinPA
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#110

Post by AndyinPA »

That was a blast from the past. :eek2:

There was only one miner in my family, a distant relative. He died of black lung disease.
"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead." -- Thomas Paine

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Volkonski
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#111

Post by Volkonski »

:)
Reuters
@Reuters
·
4m
U.S. coal-fired power plants were shut down at the second-fastest pace on record in 2019, despite President Donald Trump’s efforts to prop up the industry, according to data from the federal government and Thomson Reuters https://reut.rs/3a4o265
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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RTH10260
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#112

Post by RTH10260 »

Why do failed Trump named enterprises come to mind ?

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tek
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#113

Post by tek »

U.S. coal-fired power plants were shut down at the second-fastest pace on record in 2019, despite President Donald Trump’s efforts to prop up the industry
The Fart of the Deal once again..
There's no way back
from there to here

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Volkonski
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#114

Post by Volkonski »

Blackout on Renewable-Energy Study Called Politically Expedient

https://www.courthousenews.com/blackout ... expedient/
Accusing the Trump administration of suppressing politically inconvenient research, environmentalists filed suit Thursday to unearth a taxpayer-funded study on bolstering renewable energy that should have come out last year.

The Center for Biological Diversity says it filed a records request on the $1.5 million study in October 2019 after the Department of Energy pulled back the final report it had received from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.



Having heard nothing back from the government, the center has its suspicions on why the the study is being kept under wraps, namely that improving the grid infrastructure would reduce U.S. dependence on fossil fuels.

“If that were part of the reason why the study’s not being finalized,” attorney Howard Crystal said in an interview, “it would be consistent with what this administration has done in many other contexts where there are facts that run contrary to the administration’s desired policy.”
This Energy Department map shows how new long-distance power lines allow surplus wind and solar power to be shared.
Image
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

Jeffrey
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#115

Post by Jeffrey »

Of course it's limited to the continental US. On the topic, there have been proposals to share electricity between the Greater Antilles and even linking up to Florida for as long as I can remember. One of the major drivers of electricity prices in Puerto Rico is that unlike mainland states it can't purchase power from other states when there is a shortage or sell power when there is a surplus. Have to wait for a President crazy enough to go through with it.

https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/medi ... rumley.pdf

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RTH10260
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Re: Bye bye wind, we want coal

#116

Post by RTH10260 »

Can Coal Survive the Coronavirus?
Diminished energy demand and the high price of coal is putting pressure on the struggling industry

By Benjamin Storrow, E&E News on April 8, 2020

Add U.S. coal to the list of industries threatened by the novel coronavirus.

Part of its problem is conditions that precede the pandemic. U.S. coal plants are an aging bunch. Weak electricity demand has only intensified competition with gas and renewables.

The weather has been a drag on American miners, too; a warm winter helped push coal generation in the first quarter down by roughly a third, year over year, according to S&P Global Platts.

But the onset of the coronavirus has the makings of a slow-rolling crisis for the coal industry, analysts say.

A lockdown on economic activity in most of the United States is eroding electricity demand (Energywire, April 6). And coal generation is mirroring the decline.

American coal generation declined 36% in March compared with the same month last year, according to an E&E News review of federal figures—even as generation from natural gas and wind increased over that time period. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) said yesterday it expects coal generation to decline 20% in 2020.

The result has been a steady buildup in utility coal stockpiles. By early summer, analysts say, power companies could run out of space to store additional coal shipments.


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... ronavirus/?

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