Cops Behaving Badly

Post Reply
User avatar
mimi
Posts: 31131
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 12:01 am

Cops Behaving Badly

#1

Post by mimi » Tue Aug 26, 2014 11:16 am

Another cop suspended for using poor judgment on social media. Arkansas police chief resigns after calling reporter a ‘smelly left-wing liberal’By ReutersTuesday, August 26, 2014 10:20 EDT The reporter, Sunshine Crump, who resigned from the Jonesboro Sun last week after complaining she no longer felt safe, will rejoin the newspaper, its editor said. Angered by stories written by Crump, [Jonesboro Police Chief Mike Yates] posted comments suggesting she had an arrest record and had been suspended from the practice of law. His Facebook postings described Crump as “pro-dope smoking,” a “left-wing liberal” and “smelly.” Crump countered that her only arrest was for an anti-war protest while a college student, and that her attorney’s license fell inactive because she discontinued her law practice. Sun publisher David Mosesso said Crump would return and be assigned to a beat other than law enforcement. more:http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/08/26/a ... g-liberal/ So he kinda won anyway. A prior article: Some of Yates' comments questioned Crump personally."Wonder if ole Sunshine (reporter) could pass a drug test?," he wrote. "Why yes, she has been arrested before..."Region 8 News found no record of drug history or arrests, but Crump was arrested in Houston in 2003 for participating in an anti-war protest. The charge was dropped.Additional comments questioned Crump professionally."This is the kind of journalism we have now...," Chief Yates wrote. "Ask ole Sunshine (reporter) why her law license got suspended next time you see her."Region 8 News contacted the State Bar of Texas and found Crump lost her license not for any disciplinary action, but for allowing her license to expire by not paying her membership fees.Yates' Facebook comments also went after The Sun."I intend to help that ship sink... torpedoes away!!!," he wrote. more:http://www.kait8.com/story/26335585/jon ... ithout-pay

User avatar
Patagoniagirl
Posts: 3741
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 1:15 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#2

Post by Patagoniagirl » Tue Aug 26, 2014 11:46 am

I think this qualifies. "Kametra Barbour, a woman in Texas, does not know why she and her young kids were pulled over in their red Nissan Maximum if police in the area were responding to a call regarding a tan Toyota with four black males. One of the males was reported to be waving a gun outside the window.According to the police car’s dash cam, Barbour was pulled over and ordered to leave her children and exit the car with her hands behind her head. She asked what she’d done to get pulled over and the officer just vaguely replied, “I’ll tell you in a minute.”"http://www.addictinginfo.org/2014/08/24 ... ead-video/

User avatar
Patagoniagirl
Posts: 3741
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 1:15 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#3

Post by Patagoniagirl » Tue Aug 26, 2014 12:39 pm

An interesting article by a 21-year veteran of LE on police tactics, drugs, mental illness and frustration. Written inn reference to Thomas Kelly, a mentally ill homeless man, in Fullerton CA. Two of he officers involved in his beating were acquitted."Why is it that those who have the ability to change the culture of law enforcement instead keep the war -- not on drugs, but on people -- alive by opposing policies based on science, evidence based best practices, and compassion? How long before law enforcement sees that the faces Americans see when they look upon us are not the warriors we believe we are, but the faces of Kelly Thomas and the many others we have failed?"

User avatar
Whatever4
Posts: 12129
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 6:36 am
Location: Mainely in the plain
Occupation: Visiting doctors.

Cops Behaving Badly

#4

Post by Whatever4 » Tue Aug 26, 2014 1:46 pm

Interesting comment from an article about an Ottawa shooting. (Do comments to articles count under the 4 paragraph rule?) 6th grade science: What happens if two people are in skin to skin contact, and one of them closes an electrical circuit? The SECOND one gets shocked. A cop can't use a taser on an aggressive subject within 8 feet of him because a single lunge can cause the aggressor to come into skin-to-skin contact even if the taser hits him a millisecond after the lunge starts...and the COP will go down, entangled with the aggressor, so the cop's partner can't take the aggressive suspect/perp down.





Backyard field trial: take two kids, or two friends, and a loaded SuperSoaker into the back yard. hand one the gun, fully pumped up...it will be under about 40 ppsi at that point (a pepper spray cannister is at 47ppsi, new). You and the third person stand about 2 feet apart, 10 feet back from the person with the squirt gun. Have the person with the squirt gun shoot a continuous stream for 10 seconds at the person next to you.





Did you get any mist on your face? Inhale any moist air? Get any in or around your eyes, lips, or nostrils?


The answer to ALL of those questions is "yes", unless you were standing upwind of him in a noticeable breeze. Something no cop can be sure of doing, or take time to test, in the crunch.





Now a common sense one: someone who attacks a cop, who he KNOWS to be armed with a deadly weapon, is either intending to force the cop to kill him, or intending to win...the only way to "win" such an encounter is to kill the cop. Thus it is a VERY valid deadly threat...if you don't think someone can be beaten to death by bare hands, you're sorely mistaken.





A technical one most people don't know: Riot armor has "chicken plates" and "hard points"...and is more protected against knives, as a result. A standard police vest is NOT...it will stop a bullet BECAUSE of the kinetic energy involved...the bullet is travelling too fast, and can't part the fibers fast enough to allow penetration (they stretch, instead, to a given point, and don't "tear" neatly). Not true for a knife. Or a bow or crossbow. DEA found that one out the hard way in quite a high profile raid on a marina in Miami in the late 1980's. Basic construction of issue vests for standard wear by cops hasn't changed significantly, since, nor have the available materials. The technology for laying it more closely and mounting plates effectively has been all that's really changed.





I shot competitive handgun for 20 years, during and after my military service, taught hand to hand while in, and taught handgun marksmanship, at different points...several aspects to this. First, a knife (or suspected knife) remains a valid and effective weapon right up to a nose to nose contact fight...a handgun becomes as dangerous to you as to them, once inside arm's length, which forces you to bend your arm, where it's much easier to twist the arm and hand, and you never quite know WHICH person the gun is pointing at, at any given moment, Second, bullets ONLY stop a fight when someone has bled out to unconsciousness, or had an "immediately" vital point get hit. The only thing that "disables" is a shot in a major joint, or that shatters a long bone--and even then, it's the ONE limb, and only below the point of damage, that's disabled. Unfortunate experience on that one, on top of "the book". Outside of that, a bullet travels so fast, you often don't realize you're hit until well after the event...while a slashing knife opens long painful wounds slowly enough physical shock to local nerves doesn't happen, and it often slices ligaments and tendons while doing so, disabling the whole limb.





A cop CAN'T use less-than-lethal except between the maximum range of a taser (20 feet on most models) and the minimum safe range from a lunging attack (8 feet, plus or minus) against an aggressive subject, and can't use bean-bags from closer than 25 feet, for multiple reasons. They can't use rubber bullets as, at close range, they are just as deadly as "real" bullets (as are blanks...need proof, look up why the 80's TV show "Voyagers!" ended), and at "proper" range, they aren't meant to disable, only to sting and cause people to scatter, and back off...my son's "tweaked" airsoft rifle has more muzzle energy than one, with the heavier airsoft ammunition loaded, and my paintball rifle has MUCH more (and is capable, at close range, of making the wound so widely shown on the Ferguson mayor's gut look like a handprint from a mild spanking...it's been known to put semi-long term tattoos on people who get hit on exposed skin from too close).





So if they perceive danger to themselves, they really have ZERO option EXCEPT deadly force.





The problem is, at this point, what they generally perceive as a danger to themselves.... More discussion here: http://thefreethoughtproject.com/ottawa ... mily-begs/
"[Moderate] doesn't mean you don't have views. It just means your views aren't predictable ideologically one way or the other, and you're trying to follow the facts where they lead and reach your own conclusions."
-- Sen. King (I-ME)

User avatar
June bug
Posts: 6141
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2009 3:29 pm
Location: Northern San Diego County

Cops Behaving Badly

#5

Post by June bug » Tue Aug 26, 2014 1:51 pm

Interesting and thought-provoking comment, W4 - thanks for sharing.

User avatar
mimi
Posts: 31131
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 12:01 am

Cops Behaving Badly

#6

Post by mimi » Wed Aug 27, 2014 11:34 am

I always try to view all sides of the story. But I don't see how these cops would have much of a defence. This is in New Jersey. Christopher Hayes @chrislhayes Officer tells motorist w/ his hands up "Stop going for my gun!" when he is doing no such thing http://7online.com/archive/9440401/ http://7online.com/archive/9440401/

User avatar
Patagoniagirl
Posts: 3741
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 1:15 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#7

Post by Patagoniagirl » Thu Aug 28, 2014 2:37 pm

As we all know, there are two sides, sometimes four or five to every story, but..."A Georgia man is dead after police used their Tasers multiple times to force him to walk.Gregory Towns ran from police and was so tired after they caught up to him that he could no longer walk as police officers Marcus Eberhart and Howard Weems demanded. So what did these officers do? They used their Tasers to shock Towns into getting up and walking with them. The two officers fired their Tasers 13 times at the handcuffed man until he died, with Eberhart firing 10 of the 13 shots."In defense of the dead man, his attorney offered this:"Furthermore, Towns did nothing to deserve being treated the way he was by police. According to Stewart, “He wasn’t cursing. He wasn’t being abusive. He was saying, ‘I’m tired.’”...because cursing or being verbally abusive might be an excuse?http://www.addictinginfo.org/2014/08/27 ... ied-video/

User avatar
mimi
Posts: 31131
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 12:01 am

Cops Behaving Badly

#8

Post by mimi » Thu Aug 28, 2014 5:40 pm

His girlfriend called the cops for domestic violence. He took off when the cops got there. He was a big guy. at 6’3″ and about 275 pounds. Both cops and the victim are African-American, so race doesn't seem to be an issue here. I read that the victim had a heart condition. He ran from police almost a mile, so he was already spent and was having trouble. One of the cops hit him 10 times with the taser. The other hit him 3 times. His mom is an administrator at a hospital. I believe the suit is filed in his 7-month-old son's name. I'm guessing the cops didn't believe he couldn't walk. According to the reports, even after Weems placed his Taser against Towns’ skin and sent a five-second charge into him, Towns still said he was too tired to walk. He sat down again even after two officers helped him up.Five more times he was hit with a Taser, including one time after he had slipped down an embankment and into a creek. That time, according to one of the reports, Eberhart shocked himself as well because he was also standing in creek water when he discharged his Taser.“We could not get Towns out of the creek due to his size and weight,” Eberhart wrote about the man who 6-foot-3 and weighted about 275 pounds. “Towns was quiet and not speaking. I then checked his neck for a pulse. I was wet and cold and could not get a clear pulse.” http://www.ajc.com/news/news/lawsuit-to ... pol/ngxgc/ One of the officers resigned; the other was fired. The fired one is (or was?) appealing his termination.

User avatar
Skip Intro
Posts: 3235
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 7:12 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#9

Post by Skip Intro » Thu Aug 28, 2014 7:02 pm

St. Paul cops allegedly taser and arrest black male for sitting in public space A video showing the arrest of a black St. Paul man for allegedly sitting in a public space and refusing to give up his name surfaced yesterday, Aug. 26 — only weeks after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager in Missouri re-sparked the national debate on race and police profiling. The video, shot by the man’s cellphone, shows his interaction with officers as he attempts to pick up his children from New Horizon Academy in downtown St. Paul. As the officers force the man to put his hands behind his back, he drops his phone and the video goes black, but the audio continues and we hear the man crying for help and proclaiming that his kids are watching. Both officers in the video are white..........“I didn’t do anything wrong. I’m a working man. I take care of my kids. And I get this?” we hear him say. “And you tase me. For what? I don’t have any weapons. You’re the ones with the weapons here.” http://www.tcdailyplanet.net/news/2014/ ... blic-space
In the Trump era anything is true if enough people believe it.

User avatar
Patagoniagirl
Posts: 3741
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 1:15 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#10

Post by Patagoniagirl » Sun Sep 07, 2014 12:29 am

A start for Chicago...."It took 16 months for the Illinois “Independent Police Review Agency’ (IPRA) to test DNA evidence which ultimately confirmed that Chicago police commander, Glenn Evans, shoved his weapon into the mouth of an unarmed man. According to prosecutors, Evans shoved the gun deep into the man’s throat, then began tasing him in the groin, threatening to kill him at the same time. The victim, 22 year old Rickey J. Williams, was hiding in a closet when Evans ruthlessly attacked him. Williams was initially charged with ‘reckless behavior,’ but even that minor charge was dropped, after police failed to produce any evidence to justify following Williams into the abandoned building, where he was attempting to hide from Evans, when the assault took place."[snippy]"It’s also not the first time that Evans has tasered someone in the groin. According to NBC Chicago Evans was involved in a similar lawsuit in 2007, after he assaulted a college student, pulling down his pants and using a taser on his exposed groin area. The student, 24 year old Cordell Simmons, rolled over onto his stomach, writhing in pain. Evans then tasered him a second time, in the rectum. That suit cost Chicago taxpayers about $20,000."$20 thou? For a taz in the nuts and butt? Anyway, gotta wonder if a police commander behaved this way, just what did he tolerate in the behavior or his underlings.

User avatar
Patagoniagirl
Posts: 3741
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 1:15 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#11

Post by Patagoniagirl » Sun Sep 07, 2014 12:38 am

After reading this article again, I am disgusted that it took so long to fire this criminal. How many people have to come forward and complain before abusive cops are made to pay for their crimes? Orly has how many abusive lawsuits and we bitch about her abuses? This guy has 45, and a gun and a tazer. Maybe not a fair comparison, but sheesus gawd, this guy is a monster.

User avatar
Notorial Dissent
Posts: 12485
Joined: Thu Oct 17, 2013 8:21 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#12

Post by Notorial Dissent » Sun Sep 07, 2014 7:23 am

Unfortunately law enforecement has a strong attraction to certain types of really sick people who can otherwise pass for normal, and because of the badge can get away with things like this. I have witnessed it in my home county, and I've watched it since then in the immense payouts that have had to be made to people who have been beaten, battered, abused, and in at lesat two cases killed either by intentional or just plain indifferent negligence, and the prevailing attitude in local gov't has been to ignore it, bury it, pretend it didn't happen, except now between the payouts and civil suits they no longer can, and my suspicion is that as it progresses more will come out.
The fact that you sincerely and wholeheartedly believe that the “Law of Gravity” is unconstitutional and a violation of your sovereign rights, does not absolve you of adherence to it.

User avatar
Gnarly Goat
Posts: 2020
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 5:19 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#13

Post by Gnarly Goat » Sun Sep 07, 2014 9:00 am

The Washington Post kicked off a three part series on police seizures of cash from motorists without ever charging people for a crime. Very interesting read. http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/invest ... and-seize/ OIANAL but I found this passage to be rather chilling: Among Black Asphalt’s features is a section called BOLO, or “be on the lookout,” where police who join the network can post tips and hunches. In April, Aurora, Colo., police Officer James Waselkow pulled over a white Ford pickup for tinted windows. Waselkow said he thought the driver, a Mexican national, was suspicious in part because he wore a University of Wyoming cap.“He had no idea where he was going, what hotel he was staying in or who with,” Waselkow wrote. The officer searched the vehicle with the driver’s consent but found no contraband. But he was still suspicious, so he posted the driver’s license plate on Black Asphalt. “Released so someone else can locate the contraband,” he wrote. “Happy hunting!”Waselkow’s department did not respond to a request for an interview.
"Don't waste time mourning. Organize." - Joe Hill

User avatar
Patagoniagirl
Posts: 3741
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 1:15 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#14

Post by Patagoniagirl » Sun Sep 07, 2014 10:30 am

Those kind of seizures have been going on in the Deep South for several decades. Nice to see the practice get some national attention.

User avatar
ZekeB
Posts: 15902
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:07 pm
Location: Northwest part of Semi Blue State

Cops Behaving Badly

#15

Post by ZekeB » Sun Sep 07, 2014 11:24 am

They put an end to that in Oregon several years ago. It had gotten out of hand. Even rental vehicles not owned by the perp were being seized. To do a seizure the person must first be convicted of a crime in which the property was used. After conviction the DA must file a separate action for seizure. They seize nothing here anymore. Seizures were limited by ballot initiative, btw.
Trump: Er hat eine größere Ente als ich.

Putin: Du bist kleiner als ich.

User avatar
Patagoniagirl
Posts: 3741
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 1:15 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#16

Post by Patagoniagirl » Sun Sep 14, 2014 11:50 pm

"In February, Meister had been loading boxes of winter clothes and a snowboard that belonged to him at a friend’s house when a neighbor mistook him for a robber and called police. When officers Jeffrey Salmon, Jeffrey Tysl, Erica Bristow, and Mark Hultgren arrived on the scene, they encountered Meister and ordered him to stop. The only problem is that Meister is deaf and couldn’t hear the officers so he couldn’t obey their commands."IANAC,but I can deduce certain things about people. Like if they are deaf, or mentally ill, mentally retarded, elderly and confused. What has happened that we cannot employ decent, intelligent, discerning law enforcement officers anymore? Thank gawd they were a police force that used tazers, fists and feet, instead of bullets.http://www.addictinginfo.org/2014/09/14 ... -language/

User avatar
Patagoniagirl
Posts: 3741
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 1:15 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#17

Post by Patagoniagirl » Sun Sep 14, 2014 11:51 pm

They put an end to that in Oregon several years ago. It had gotten out of hand. Even rental vehicles not owned by the perp were being seized. To do a seizure the person must first be convicted of a crime in which the property was used. After conviction the DA must file a separate action for seizure. They seize nothing here anymore. Seizures were limited by ballot initiative, btw.Good. Oregon goes up another notch for me.

User avatar
Sugar Magnolia
Posts: 10345
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2012 6:44 am

Cops Behaving Badly

#18

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Mon Sep 15, 2014 4:49 am

IANAC,but I can deduce certain things about people. Like if they are deaf, or mentally ill, mentally retarded, elderly and confused.How can you deduce those things so easily? And if it is so easy to do, why are there training classes to teach officers how to recognize they are dealing with mentally ill of Deaf people? I taught a class at the police academy for several years on recognizing Deaf and it's not as easy as you think it is. Nor is it easy to recognize a mentally ill person by sight. Also, many people don't realize that when excited or upset or angry (any situation that would make a hearing person raise their voice) a Deaf will become more animated with their hand and body movements and that can easily be taken as aggression by a cop who doesn't realize they are deaf. The vast majority of ASL signs involve both hands and are performed outward from the body. To non-trained officers, and some who are, the determination of a signer to communicate the only way they know how is taken as resistance. From a personal perspective, I was first on the scene of a murder one night and as we were taping off the scene, a car pulled up and a woman and teenager jumped out. The woman began screaming and the boy ran towards the body. We were all trying to stop the kid from getting to the body but he wasn't responding to us at all. The closest officers tackled him before he got past the tape and he was "fighting" with 3 of them. Even though I had some knowledge of ASL from community college classes I had taken, it still took me a bit to realize he was trying to sign. By that point the other officers had him handcuffed and he was still struggling. The mother (of the dead boy and the struggling boy) was still screaming and didn't realize the other son was handcuffed. It could have turned into an even worse situation than it already was if I hadn't gotten to the other officers and told them what was going on. They cuffed him in the front and, with my VERY rudimentary signing, we figured out that the victim was his brother. The mother was completely hysterical and totally useless to us at that point. This isn't to say I saved the day, just to point out how difficult it can be to recognize a Deaf. After that experience, I took several more ASL classes here locally and then a semester at Gallaudet in DC. Then I came back and taught other officers how to recognize they might be dealing with hearing-impaired or deaf people. It's not fool proof but it's better than nothing. As for recognizing the mentally ill, at best, there's probably a 50/50 chance you know you're dealing with one unless they are in a complete psychotic episode or have some sort of physical manifestation in addition. We dealt with people regularly who could sound perfectly normal until you talked to them for several minutes or happened to speak "magic words" that set them off, or made some sort of "secret move" that they responded to or accidentally hit whatever trigger they had. Think of some of the sov cits we discuss right here on this board. You probably can't look at them and know how dangerous they can be to a cop but the Kehoes are a good example of how a situation can turn to shit in an instant. Any cop believing that they can identify physical or mental impairments on sight and respond accordingly is much more dangerous on the street than one who approaches each situation as it is presented to them.

User avatar
Plutodog
Posts: 11952
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 10:11 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#19

Post by Plutodog » Mon Sep 15, 2014 5:22 am

I understand it's not easy but I'm not satisfied with that. I believe we need to train all law enforcement to recognize and deal with these populations effectively and humanely and not kill them off because we couldn't figure out why they were ignoring them. Of course, I'm the father of an Autistic 30 year old who could well be misunderstood, mishandled by anybody with a need to dominate, win a power struggle over a person who really doesn't get it. Most terrifying thing to imagine what might be his end in a tragic circumstance.
The only good Bundy is an Al Bundy.

User avatar
Sugar Magnolia
Posts: 10345
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2012 6:44 am

Cops Behaving Badly

#20

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Mon Sep 15, 2014 5:45 am

What sort of training would you implement for officers to identify and deal with those populations?

User avatar
Patagoniagirl
Posts: 3741
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 1:15 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#21

Post by Patagoniagirl » Mon Sep 15, 2014 11:17 am

It isn't a matter of just learning to deal with "those populations". It is a matter of learning to deal with the population in general. Starting with intensive psyche to weed out the cowboys types and those with violently aggressive tendencies would be a start. In the Latin American Countries I have lived in, I have had the pleasure of meeting and observing law enforcement officers doing their jobs. Two of those countries are stellar in their day-to-day dealings with the civilian population, the drunks, the mentally ill, the deaf, disabled, blind and hysterical. In Chile, they start with a higher standard for police officer cadets. A candidate must go through a background check which includes immediate family. If anyone in the family has any criminal record, you can't be a police officer. Might be unfair, and I am not sure the reasoning, but that is how it is. Then, the candidate must have at least a Bachelors Degree. Police there do not get their feet wet first as prison and jail guards as many officers in the US do. They are required to continue with college courses throughout their career, pursuing just about any degree they wish, and not in police tactics, but in things like engineering, agricultural sciences, etc. They do community policing. Live in their communities, check in on old folks; their offices are always open to talk with anyone who has an issue that bothers them, and often act as ambassadors to newcomers and tourists. In the town close to where I lived they had about 25 full-time officers. On fiesta nights, especially when it was very cold, they patrolled the streets in a big paddy wagon. When they found someone passed out or inebriated, they would load them up and take them back to the bunk house where there were beds and a warm fire in the wood stove. Their mission was to keep these folks from freezing to death. Family disputes were handled with sit downs at the family table and violent people were talked down until they were calm when they would be taken to be booked. Thefts were handled easily as the entire community like their cops and readily will bring in a family member or disclose seeing the stolen articles. Yeah, I know, it sounds a bit like Andy Griffith. But the fact is that by have calm, intelligent, highly respected police officers with a community they are invested in, and the community invested in them, police have little need to be aggressive and violent. Panama had a long, dark history with its militarized police. Corruption, violence, criminal elements inside the police force. In 2008-2009, Panama turned to Chile for help overhauling its police force. Having lived for several years in Panama, I can tell you that encountering police in Panama was a very intimidating situation. Dressed in full military gear brandishing side arms and M-16s, being treated in an aggressive manner at check points or walking in the capital was disturbing. Shakedowns, being pressed for bribes. At the time of the changeover, I was in Patagonia, and recall the great country-wide grief when the head of the Chilean Police was killed in a helicopter crash over Panama City, Panama while visiting to celebrate the implementation of Chilean-style policing. Every single police station in Chile was adorned with flowers, candles and prayer cards. Chileans love their Carabineros. Returning to Panama, Mista and I were shocked to be stopped at a checkpoint, only to be asked if we were enjoying Panama, and was their anything they could help us with. No waving guns, no aggressive behavior. They still have some very aggressive riot police who have done some Ferguson-style tactics, but for the most part, police here have changed dramatically. Of course the Noriega thugs have mostly been drummed out of the upper ranks or died off. At the border station close to where I live now, the police still wear military uniforms and have a well-stocked arms room, but you are likely to see them giving free hair cuts to the indigenous kids on Saturdays and placing crosswalk cones for children getting off and on the bus from school. I take the cops there cakes and coffee from time-to-time. They go on road patrols, coming up this way, stopping at the small farms and houses just to check in and make sure everyone has their emergency numbers. I cannot believe that citizens are more dangerous in the US than in the places I have lived outside of the US. However, I do believe that police in the US are of the mindset that most of the people they encounter ARE dangerous. Pretextual stops are big, I know in Florida. Don't have much experience elsewhere there. Being pulled over to check the temporary tag on my car with my 6 foot 4 inch tall black son in the car with me and him being asked for his ID and where we were going, was an intrusion an entirely unnecessary as my tag was not expired and completely legal. I got some hassle over the fact that I did not have a paper insurance card, though I had just gotten the e-card the night before on email and we were going to the library to print it out. This is the kind of thing that happens to (blahhhh) people all the time. So, a start would be better screening, higher standards and real community policing. The third country is Costa Rica. Most police there are not even armed. Pura Vida, man:)

User avatar
Plutodog
Posts: 11952
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 10:11 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#22

Post by Plutodog » Mon Sep 15, 2014 4:04 pm

Patagoniagirl has a huge piece of the picture. If you're going into law enforcement because you think you've great powers for achieving and maintaining the peace through overwhelming force and physical strength, skill with deadly weapons, I think you're in the wrong business. If you have to "win" any power struggle and do so at all cost and poste haste. If you're not that person, there is familiarization and training available. "We just don't have the time, the resources, the luxury, the whatever" is just not an adequate response, IMO. It's cowardly, simple-minded, wrong-headed in a uniform with a badge and weaponry, as far as I'm concerned. And yes, that's an emotional response. To Protect and Serve...it ought to be more than a bullshit term that lasts as long as LE feels they're in total control. There are multiple, varied and available sources of familiarization, training out there for those who really want it, value the lives and well-being of these populations. Just a few to start with. http://www.lifeprint.com/asl101/topics/ ... /jail/1385
The only good Bundy is an Al Bundy.

User avatar
Chilidog
Posts: 9849
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:36 am

Cops Behaving Badly

#23

Post by Chilidog » Mon Sep 15, 2014 4:23 pm

There was a tragic accident down the street from my house in Sunday. A speeding police car struck and killed a pedestrian. The police car was driving at high speed and I suspect without a siren ( they never sound the sirens at that time of morning.)The pedestrian may have been drinking. He left a house party and got lost looking for his car.

User avatar
Patagoniagirl
Posts: 3741
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 1:15 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#24

Post by Patagoniagirl » Mon Sep 15, 2014 5:35 pm

"The statement from Utah County Chief Deputy Attorney Tim Taylor said police received a report of a “suspicious” individual with a sword. “When the officers made contact with Mr. Hunt, preliminary evidence suggests that Mr. Hunt brandished the sword and lunged toward the officers with the sword, at which time Mr. Hunt was shot,” the statement said. “There is currently no indication that race played any role in the confrontation between Mr. Hunt and the police officers.” Taylor said the department would issue findings at the conclusion of its investigation.Utah has an open carry law, meaning that residents are permitted to openly carry guns even if they don’t have a permit. Police are therefore likely to encounter other individuals walking down the street with guns, and it’s unclear at what point they would be considered “suspicious.”"Considering eye witnesses and the autopsy, it seems not to be the case. Butwe will wait for the final disposition to have any opinions.Just sharing the incident.http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2014/0 ... s-in-utah/

User avatar
Patagoniagirl
Posts: 3741
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 1:15 pm

Cops Behaving Badly

#25

Post by Patagoniagirl » Tue Sep 16, 2014 9:14 pm

Kid tries to tell cop his power windows aren't working after being stopped for a traffic infraction. Now he is in a coma. This seems to be turning out to be rapidly different.. No protest needed for FBI investigations."When a cop stopped 17-year-old Bryce Masters for a traffic violation, the teen had no idea his life was about to crash in around him, no idea he would land in the intensive care unit in critical condition and in a coma. Masters is the son Kansas City, Mo. police officer, Matt Masters. Unlucky for the cop who stopped him. Hopefully very unlucky. The FBI has launched an investigation into the Kansas City teen’s interaction with Independence, Mo. [Kansas City metro area] police officer."[snip]""According to witness Robert Baker, who lives near, police overreacted,“Several times, the cop put his foot on the kid like he was stepping on his neck, but it was on his back. I think (the officer) was wrong, because the kid tried to explain to him that his window won’t roll down.”Debbie Godfrey watched the incident from her home across the street. She said that the officer put Masters in handcuffs then,“Runnels dragged Masters to a nearby driveway and dropped him on the pavement.“His head hit the pavement in the driveway. I was horrified of the whole situation and the way it all came down.”"http://www.kansascity.com/news/local/cr ... 16563.html

Post Reply

Return to “Courts, Law, and Legal Issues”