Congressional Review Act: Restore Net Neutrality

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Addie
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Congressional Review Act: Restore Net Neutrality

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Post by Addie » Sat Dec 16, 2017 2:10 pm

New York Daily News
Schumer rips FCC's net neutrality repeal, backs effort to overturn decision

ALBANY — Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on Friday threw his support behind legislative efforts to restore so-called net neutrality.

Schumer, a New York Democrat, said he would back a Congressional Review Act resolution to overturn this week’s decision by the Federal Communications Commission to repeal regulations that barred internet service providers from blocking or slowing web traffic.

“The bottom line is: America depends on a free and open internet to spur innovation and job creation,” Schumer said at a Manhattan press conference with tech industry leaders.

Schumer said the repeal of net neutrality rules was a “Christmas gift from the FCC” to major broadband providers that would harm consumers and make it harder for start-up companies to get off the ground.


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Slim Cognito
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Re: Congressional Review Act: Restore Net Neutrality

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Post by Slim Cognito » Sat Dec 16, 2017 2:33 pm

Don't have link but just read that a California state congressman has introduced legislation that would require internet providers comply with net neutrality before they could operate in the state.



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Re: Congressional Review Act: Restore Net Neutrality

#3

Post by Addie » Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:03 pm

Bloomberg
Skepticism Greets Republican Plan to Restore Net Neutrality Rules

A key Republican lawmaker has offered legislation to restore net neutrality protections that the U.S. Federal Communications Commission yanked last week.

“Our goal is to preserve access to a free and open internet and to make certain that we’re continuing to see innovation in this space,” Marsha Blackburn, a Tennessee Republican who is chairman of the House Subcommittee on Communications and Technology, said in an interview with Bloomberg Television.

But while Democrats have objected to the FCC’s action, they have been skeptical of open-internet proposals from Republicans that would crimp the agency’s future ability to oversee broadband providers such as AT&T Inc. and Comcast Corp.

Senator Ed Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat, said Blackburn’s bill “doesn’t just rip authority away from the FCC to protect consumers, it goes further to undermine the very spirit of net neutrality by allowing broadband providers to establish internet fast and slow lanes.”

“We are at the point of litigation, not legislation,” as groups look to federal courts to overturn the FCC’s decision, he said.


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Re: Congressional Review Act: Restore Net Neutrality

#4

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Tue Jan 09, 2018 8:22 pm

https://www.aclu.org/blog/free-speech/i ... neutrality
The Little-Known Congressional Procedure That Could Save Net Neutrality

A law called the Congressional Review Act allows Congress to follow special expedited procedures to overturn agency actions with which it disagrees. Congress has 60 legislative days to act once the agency action has been formally posted and presented to the House and Senate. (Given the convoluted way that Congress counts a legislative day, our best guess is that the clock would run out in early to mid-June or so.) While the countdown hasn’t started yet, Democrats announced today that they have succeeded in getting the minimum 30 names necessary to force a vote.

The Senate is a famously slow and deliberative chamber, where oftentimes one senator can block a bill from moving — and even if it moves, the bill needs 60 votes to overcome a filibuster. The Congressional Review Act has special provisions that negate some of these procedural quirks. As with any piece of legislation, a joint CRA “resolution of disapproval,” filed in both chambers, is referred to the committee that has the relevant jurisdiction. With most pieces of legislation, a committee chairperson who doesn’t like a bill simply refuses to let his or her committee act on the measure. But under the Congressional Review Act, 20 calendar days after the measure is given to the committee, the measure moves to the floor once 30 senators have expressed support for it in writing. Since 37 Democratic senators have already signed on to this proposed resolution of disapproval, they’ll now be able to force a vote after the committee receives the resolution.

The Senate majority leader controls the calendar and the agenda, together with the senators from his party. But under the CRA, any senator can bring up the joint CRA resolution for a vote at any time once the 30 senators have removed the matter from committee. Debate in the Senate is limited to 10 hours, after which the vote takes place. Most importantly, the resolution only requires a majority of votes to pass in the Senate — meaning, if the Democrats are united, they only need two Republicans to join them.

[T]here are no special rules in the House to guarantee a vote on the CRA resolution. But under the regular rules of the House, there is a mechanism allowing the discharge of a bill from committee along similar procedural lines as the CRA allows in the Senate. Unfortunately, a discharge petition in the House requires a full majority of the chamber — a much taller task than what the special minority rights provision enables in the Senate.

If Trump were to veto the resolution, Congress could overturn that action with a two-thirds vote in each chamber, as with any other bill.


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