Schools and Education

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mimi
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#1

Post by mimi » Sun Feb 17, 2013 12:43 am

This is a For Profit Cyber School








Email Directs Teachers To Delete Bad Grades





Monday, February 11, 2013 7:40 PM EST Updated: Feb 11, 2013 09:12 PM





At the center of the controversy is the Tennessee Virtual Academy -- a for-profit, online public school that Republican lawmakers touted as a way to improve education in Tennessee. Two years ago, state lawmakers voted to let K12 Inc. open the school, using millions of taxpayer dollars.





But, now, those lawmakers are concerned about standardized test results that put it among the worst schools in the state.The email -- labeled "important -- was written in December by the Tennessee Virtual Academy's vice principal to middle school teachers.





"After ... looking at so many failing grades, we need to make some changes before the holidays," the email begins.





Among the changes: Each teacher "needs to take out the October and September progress [reports]; delete it so that all that is showing is November progress."more here:


[/break1]newschannel5.com/story/21129693/email-directs-teachers-to-delete-bad-grades]http://www.newschannel5.com/story/21129 ... bad-grades





apparently also going on in Michigan:





About a year ago, Working America members along with Michigan parents, teachers, and students fought to keep a “cyber schools” bill from passing through the legislature. The bill called for a portion of public education funding – about $7.2 billion of Michigan taxpayer dollars – to be diverted to online-only, unaccountable for-profit school programs. Those schools would be run by a Virginia-based for-profit education company called K12 Inc. Not coincidentally, K12 Inc. had lobbyists on the scene in Lansing to sway legislators to their side.





We fought SB 619 to a draw, but Gov. Rick Snyder cut deals with lawmakers and squeezed it through the Republican-controlled Michigan House by a one-vote margin.





Since that time, Michigan education results have not improved, but K12 Inc. has still made out like bandits on the backs of Michigan taxpayers. K12 Inc. is a member of ALEC, the insidious right-wing organization that produces corporate-backed bills for legislators to pass in states. With programs around the country, they made $522 million in profits in 2011 alone – that’s $336 per student.more here:





[/break1]workingamerica.org/2013/02/14/if-this-happened-at-a-public-school-people-would-be-freaking-out/]http://blog.workingamerica.org/2013/02/ ... aking-out/





I would actually be happy if there was a good cyber school for kids who have too far to travel to go to school.





I don't think it can be the entire program, but enrichment.





I know some people who are homeschooling. If they were to attend school, they would be gone about 12 hours each day (including the very long bus trip).





But so far, this looks like a big fail for everyone but the school's profit margin.

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#2

Post by Curious Blue » Sun Feb 17, 2013 12:53 am

I would actually be happy if there was a good cyber school for kids who have too far to travel to go to school. There is. It's called Khan Academy and it's free. See: [/break1]khanacademy.org/]https://www.khanacademy.org/There are tons of other resources available online for free or fairly low cost.I'm not saying that it all needs to be free. But public money obviously shouldn't be subsidizing for-profit outfits like K12 Inc.

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#3

Post by Shagnastie » Sun Feb 17, 2013 3:23 pm

I supervised a cyber-learning program in the last district I worked for before retirement. We instituted and used it primarily to help four groups:1. Motivated students who wanted to get ahead on their graduation requirements.2. Students who had fallen behind on coursework and needed to catch up.3. Struggling students who needed reinforcement.4. Certain students in discipline and behavior management programs.It helped all four, but was of the most benefit to group #1. However (and somewhat to our surprise), we discovered that to be really effective, student use had to be pretty intensely supervised by someone well-trained in the system. Some students were allowed to use it at home, but this did not work nearly as well as closely monitored on-campus setups. For example, we had one group of about 15 students taking the algebra course offering after regular school hours and it took two qualified supervisors (a teacher and an aide) to provide adequate and efficient backup.

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#4

Post by TollandRCR » Tue Mar 19, 2013 3:17 pm

Spiritual Sounding Board March 17, 2013 [link]Homeschool Anonymous and Training up Children the Homeschool Movement Way,http://spiritualsoundingboard.com/2013/ ... ement-way/[/link]. (This is the new blog by Julie Anne Smith, who was sued by Chuck O'Neal and the Beaverton Grace Bible Church for defamation. The pastor and his church lost and were ordered to pay the defendants' costs and attorney fees.) Smith reflects on her experience with a particular kind of homeschooling, a kind designed to "Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it. (Proverbs 22:6) She now recognizes it as a form of religious indoctrination. She also recognizes that it does not always work as promised. You see that verse? Probably every homeschool parent heard that verse too many times to count throughout their homeschooling years. It was engrained in us. We did not want our children to depart from “the way they should go” and the solution was to “train” our children. At least that’s what they told us.Ever since my spiritual abuse journey, I have been trying to figure out what led our family to that spiritually abusive church and pastor who sued us in an attempt to discover who our primary influencers were over the years. I found that the most influential people in the last couple of decades have been leaders in the homeschool movement who had a spiritual agenda, not necessarily an educational agenda. We have been taught so strongly to “train our children” and some of us did that quite well. We created little obedient and compliant robot children who were polite, respected authority and looked really good in church all lined up in a pew. People always commended us on our beautiful large family....What many are finding out is that those brilliant robots, when released to the real world, start questioning where they came from, what they believed, where they are going. This is a normal response for young adults. But I’ve seeing a disturbing trend especially among young adults who were raised in this kind of environment. Many of these “trained” adult kids are now venturing 180 degrees in the opposite direction, perhaps in response to the controlled environment in which they were raised, some suffering a host of problems similar to what spiritual abuse victims experience that I deal with so often: mental health issues, addiction issues, etc. There is a lot of heartache among this group.I feel very responsible for buying into this garbage. I will continue to speak out against disturbing aspects of the homeschool movement on my blog. It takes a lot of emotional energy to work up one of these posts because it means I have to admit my failure. Of course my blog will also continue to be a platform for these precious young adults. I believe in a way that some of us parents were cult leaders in our families. We were fed an agenda by those home school leaders. We believed it. We saw their perfect families and wanted to emulate what we saw and expected that kind of obedience and educational excellence from our children. We trained them alright.Smith is clearly not aware that homeschooling need not be religious in content or motivation. However, it often is just that in a way that shuts down minds -- at least for a while.
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#5

Post by mimi » Fri Mar 29, 2013 8:11 pm

Atlanta educators indicted in cheating scandal





A grand jury indicted about three dozen educators Friday in one of the nation's largest cheating scandals that rocked Atlanta's public schools.





The indictment named the former Superintendent Beverly Hall as well as several high-level administrators, principals and teachers. Hall faces charges including racketeering, false statements and theft. She retired just days before the 2011 probe was released, and has previously denied the allegations.





A state investigation in 2011 found cheating by nearly 180 educators in 44 Atlanta schools. Educators gave answers to students or changed answers on tests after they were turned in, investigators said. Teachers who tried to report it faced retaliation, creating a culture of "fear and intimidation" in the district.





The cheating came to light after The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported that some scores were statistically improbable.[/break1]cbsnews.com/8301-201_162-57577096/atlanta-educators-indicted-in-cheating-scandal/]http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-201_162-575 ... g-scandal/











Former Superintendent Beverly Hall faced charges including racketeering, false statements and theft because prosecutors said some of the bonuses she received were tied to falsified scores.The previous state investigation in 2011 found cheating by nearly 180 educators in 44 Atlanta schools. Educators gave answers to students or changed answers on tests after they were turned in, investigators said. Teachers who tried to report it faced retaliation, creating a culture of "fear and intimidation" in the district.In a video message to schools staff before she retired, Hall warned that the state investigation launched by former Gov. Sonny Perdue would likely reveal "alarming" behavior.





"It's become increasingly clear that a segment of our staff chose to violate the trust that was placed in them," Hall said. "There is simply no excuse for unethical behavior and no room in this district for unethical conduct. I am confident that aggressive, swift action will be taken against anyone who believed so little in our students and in our system of support that they turned to dishonesty as the only option."[/break1]go.com/US/wireStory/dozen-indicted-atlanta-cheating-scandal-18842898#.UVYs-Veuk6I]http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/doze ... VYs-Veuk6I

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#6

Post by SueDB » Mon Apr 01, 2013 12:31 am

So how many blek students were affected?????....Non athletes of course.
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#7

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Mon Apr 01, 2013 5:23 am

So how many blek students were affected?????....Non athletes of course.The Atlanta Public School System is located within Fulton County. Most other school systems in Georgia are defined by county lines, but APS is a special case of a city school district within a county school district. This makes it a much smaller area, but with a more concentrated population. APS is made up of 98 schools and is directed by the Atlanta Board of Education. The board is made up of 6 people representing 6 separate geographical districts, and 3 people representing 3 “at large” districts. They are elected for 4 year terms. Superintendent Dr. Beverly Hall's term will end this Summer. The student enrollment at APS is currently at 47,944. About 81% of the students are African American, 11% are White, 5% are Hispanic, and the remaining percentage are multiracial or other. What is significant about these numbers is the fact that compared to the rest of the school systems in Georgia, APS has a much higher percentage of African American students and a much lower percentage of White, Hispanic, and Asian. The neighboring counties like Gwinnett and Cobb have especially high numbers of Hispanics. [/break1]blogspot.com/2011/04/breakdown-of-atlanta-public-school.html]http://educationatlanta.blogspot.com/20 ... chool.htmlProbably 81% or more. And my oldest daughter announced yesterday that she is moving back to Atlanta this summer, either to take a job in the APS or to go to graduate school there. The State Dept isn't currently approving travel to Korea for teachers apparently.

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#8

Post by mimi » Mon Apr 01, 2013 1:30 pm

Since NCLB [No Child Left Behind], signed in 2001, first mandated high-stakes testing in every state and tied it to federal funding, a wave of cheating scandals has swept the nation. In 2011, USA Today investigated standardized test scores in six states and Washington, D.C., and found “1,610 examples of anomalies in which public school classes—a school’s entire fifth grade, for example—boasted what analysts regard as statistically rare, perhaps suspect, gains on state tests.”Months later, education reporter Dana Goldstein argued that “the most egregious practices in Atlanta…are part of a national, and indeed a historic trend, one that is bolstered by No Child Left Behind’s emphasis on pressuring educators to produce spectacular test results.”In Georgia, the pressure to hold onto federal funds may have been exacerbated by state-level defunding of the education system. According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Georgia has cut education spending per student by 14.8% since 2008. The Chatatanooga Times Free Press, a local paper from the neighboring state of Tennessee, reports “public education in Georgia has missed out on $5.5 billion in funding since 2003 because of the General Assembly’s austerity cuts.”[/break1]msnbc.com/2013/04/01/atlanta-cheating-scandal-puts-national-education-policy-on-trial/]http://tv.msnbc.com/2013/04/01/atlanta- ... -on-trial/

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#9

Post by mimi » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:11 am

How to lose the future


By Steve Benen


-


Tue Apr 2, 2013 8:43 AM EDT








The sequestration has affected a Head Start center in Indiana to the point where there's a lottery to determine which kids can stay.





And then this story from Obama is shared back in his first year about a luncheon he attended with the then-president of South Korea:








"I was interested in education policy -- they've grown enormously over the last 40 years. And I asked him, what are the biggest challenges in your education policy? He said, 'The biggest challenge that I have is that my parents are too demanding.' He said, 'Even if somebody is dirt poor, they are insisting that their kids are getting the best education.' He said, 'I've had to import thousands of foreign teachers because they're all insisting that Korean children have to learn English in elementary school.' That was the biggest education challenge that he had, was an insistence, a demand from parents for excellence in the schools.





"And the same thing was true when I went to China. I was talking to the mayor of Shanghai, and I asked him about how he was doing recruiting teachers, given that they've got 25 million people in this one city. He said, 'We don't have problems recruiting teachers because teaching is so revered and the pay scales for teachers are actually comparable to doctors and other professions.'





"That gives you a sense of what's happening around the world. There is a hunger for knowledge, an insistence on excellence, a reverence for science and math and technology and learning. That used to be what we were about."




benen:





Too many American policymakers have gone from insisting on excellence to insisting on slashing public investments. The goal isn't to keep the United States on top as a global superpower; the goal is to shrink government, cut taxes, and hope for the best. We're the wealthiest country on the planet by an order of magnitude, so maybe we can just coast for a while, neglecting key priorities.more:


[/break1]msnbc.com/_news/2013/04/02/17568484-how-to-lose-the-future?lite]http://maddowblog.msnbc.com/_news/2013/ ... uture?lite

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#10

Post by mimi » Tue Apr 02, 2013 8:50 pm

Tennessee figured out that their school voucher bill would fund Muslim schools. They can't figure out how to make that not happen. So, they'll kill the bill.








Tennessee Republicans threaten to kill GOP voucher bill over fear of funding Muslim schools





[/break1]rawstory.com/rs/2013/04/02/tennessee-republicans-threaten-to-kill-gop-voucher-bill-over-fear-of-funding-muslim-schools/]http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/04/02/t ... m-schools/








ok with me. I'd rather not fund any religious schools.

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#11

Post by Skip Intro » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:10 pm

Atlanta educators indicted in cheating scandal





Indicted educators surrender in Atlanta school testing scandal





Is it just me, or are these bond amounts incredibly high for the charge?





$2 million — Principals


Armstead Salters, Gideons Elementary School


Christopher Waller, Parks Middle School


Willie Davenport, D.H. Stanton Elementary School


Clariettta Davis, Venetian Elementary School


Dana Evans, Dobbs Elementary School


Lucious Brown, Kennedy Middle School





$1 million – Testing coordinators


Theresia Copeland, Benteen Elementary School


Lera Middlebrooks, Dunbar Elementary School


Donald Bullock, Usher-Collier Heights Elementary School


Francis Mack, D.H. Stanton Elementary School


Sandra Ward, Parks Middle School


Sheridan Rogers, Gideons Elementary School





$1 million — Assistant principal


Tabeeka Jordan, Deerwood Academy


Gregory Reid, Parks Middle School





$500,000 – Teachers


Angela Williamson, Dobbs Elementary School


Derrick Broadwater, Dobbs Elementary School





$400,000 – Teachers


Wendy Ahmed, Humphries Elementary School


Starlette Mitchell, Parks Middle School


Ingrid Abella-Sly, Humphries Elementary School


Sheila Evans, Benteen Elementary School


Shayla Smith, Dobbs Elementary School





$300,000 – Teachers


Dessa Curb, Dobbs Elementary School


Gloria Ivey, Dunbar Elementary School


Lisa Terry, Dunbar Elementary School


Diane Buckner-Webb, Dunbar Elementary School


Pamela Cleveland, Dunbar Elementary School





$200,000 — School improvement specialist


Tameka Goodson, Kennedy Middle School





$200,000 — Teachers


Kimberly Oden, Parks Middle School


Shani Robinson, Dunbar Elementary School





$200,000 — Secretary


Carol Dennis, Kennedy Middle School
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#12

Post by John Thomas8 » Wed Apr 03, 2013 1:52 pm

And not content to make a state religion, the NCGA is going all out moron on charter schools:





[/break1]newsobserver.com/2013/04/03/2798980/nc-senate-committee-approves-charter.html]RALEIGH — The state Senate Education Committee approved a bill Wednesday changing the way charter schools are governed, including dropping the requirement that those schools have licensed teachers.





The bill would create a new governing board filled with charter school supporters who would be in charge of approving charters and monitoring existing schools. It would limit the power of the state Board of Education, which now approves and monitors charter schools, to only being able to reject new charters with a three-fourths vote.

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#13

Post by ProudObot » Wed Apr 03, 2013 3:19 pm

And not content to make a state religion, the NCGA is going all out moron on charter schools:





[/break1]newsobserver.com/2013/04/03/2798980/nc-senate-committee-approves-charter.html]RALEIGH — The state Senate Education Committee approved a bill Wednesday changing the way charter schools are governed, including dropping the requirement that those schools have licensed teachers.





The bill would create a new governing board filled with charter school supporters who would be in charge of approving charters and monitoring existing schools. It would limit the power of the state Board of Education, which now approves and monitors charter schools, to only being able to reject new charters with a three-fourths vote.That'll Shirley make the skoolz lotz better. Unlicensed teachers in many charter schools have already shown they have even worse results, so hey, why not just keep increasing the pool? ](*,)





There are certainly some excellent charter schools, but the good ones that I know of hire licensed teachers. These teachers are able to actually teach, as opposed to teaching to a test. This makes a huge difference. The idea of letting a plan like the one mentioned above be used is appalling to me. Sounds like nepotism will be in effect once again, but this time without any training or experience being needed.

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#14

Post by A Legal Lohengrin » Wed Apr 03, 2013 4:41 pm

Too bad for the kids.But as for the moron states, hey fuck up your state all you like. More jobs for the sane people with an actual education.

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#15

Post by mimi » Sat Apr 06, 2013 10:40 am

Ron Paul is offering a free homeschool curriculum.














so in about 10 or 20 years, the Paultards will be running the country.





Here's the ron paul curriculum site:





[/break1]ronpaulcurriculum.com/]http://www.ronpaulcurriculum.com/





but there's more.


How to Start a Profitable For-Profit K-12 School: Use the Ron Paul Curriculum.


Gary North - April 06, 2013





The school can then hire a teacher with a bachelor's degree, newly minted and probably not worth more than about $35,000 a year. This teacher teaches the largest number of students that the state allows in a classroom. Let us say that this is 35 students per teacher. If each student pays $1000 a year, this will cover the teacher's salary. But students in private schools are usually forced to pay at least $3000 a year. So, this is certainly enough to pay for the operations of the school. In my opinion, it should be more than enough. The school will become highly profitable. It can cut tuition to $2,500 a year. Maybe it can cut it to $2,000.





The keys to profitability are these: (1) increase the student-to-teacher ratio to the maximum allowable; (2) to hire brand-new teachers who can be paid low salaries, because these teachers are in abundance. This way, the major expense of the operation of any private school is reduced to a minimum, and the student is in no way harmed academically. The student does not need a teacher who has 30 years of experience, and who is paid twice what a brand-new teacher out of some state university is paid.





The teacher will have virtually no input. The teacher has only disciplinary functions. She fulfills a requirement imposed by the state. The teacher is also there to make certain that the insurance company is willing to offer insurance to the school. But for teaching the students, the teacher will have virtually no function. Maybe she will read daily essays. She probably can do that with no problem. But now that computer software is going to be made available that grades the essays, this will not even be required.





Everything is moving towards online teaching, and I intend to make available the Ron Paul Curriculum to every private Christian high school in America. I intend to make it available to private middle schools.





The courses are free from kindergarten through the fifth grade.more here:


[/break1]garynorth.com/public/10861.cfm]http://www.garynorth.com/public/10861.cfm








And as we know the Republicans are pushing school vouchers. So, it sounds to me like taxpayers are gonna pay for the Paultards education.

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#16

Post by kate520 » Sat Apr 06, 2013 11:46 am

I guess we can kiss our democracy goodbye, an educated populace being necessary to keep it going. I can see the effects right now of the last 30 years of dumbed down education. I bet Tolland does, too. And LM K...indeed, anyone who teaches.
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#17

Post by A Legal Lohengrin » Sat Apr 06, 2013 1:46 pm

The school can then hire a teacher with a bachelor's degree, newly minted and probably not worth more than about $35,000 a year.This right here is what is wrong with our model of education. You'd think the supposedly business-oriented libertards would know the simple adage you get what you pay for. If you don't think your teachers are worth a damn, you'll get teachers who aren't. There are really two kinds of teachers these days. Seriously dedicated teachers who are willing to take the shit sandwich that is our educational system, and people incompetent to do anything else. In other countries, ones that are beating us hollow in educating their citizens, teacher is considered one of the more prestigious professions. Here, apparently, despite all the grunting noises repigs make about "the kids," they seriously don't give a shit about our future.

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#18

Post by ZekeB » Sat Apr 06, 2013 9:07 pm

In other countries, ones that are beating us hollow in educating their citizens, teacher is considered one of the more prestigious professions. Here, apparently, despite all the grunting noises repigs make about "the kids," they seriously don't give a shit about our future.Repigs don't give a squat about education unless they themselves are educated it's their own kids. Those who do care are wealthy enough to send their kids to private schools. They don't want to be bothered with taxes to pay for other people's kids. The middle and underclass nut jobs are not well educated themselves and see little value in educating their kids. I'm watching the dumbing down of America and generally the fault does not lay with the teachers.High school dropouts being allowed to homeschool their kids. There is something wrong with that.
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#19

Post by A Legal Lohengrin » Sat Apr 06, 2013 9:09 pm

In other countries, ones that are beating us hollow in educating their citizens, teacher is considered one of the more prestigious professions. Here, apparently, despite all the grunting noises repigs make about "the kids," they seriously don't give a shit about our future.Repigs don't give a squat about education unless they themselves are educated it's their own kids. Those who do care are wealthy enough to send their kids to private schools. They don't want to be bothered with taxes to pay for other people's kids. The middle and underclass nut jobs are not well educated themselves and see little value in educating their kids. I'm watching the dumbing down of America and generally the fault does not lay with the teachers.I think I worded that awkwardly. The "they" who don't give a shit are the repigs, not the teachers.

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#20

Post by magdalen77 » Sat Apr 06, 2013 11:30 pm

The school can then hire a teacher with a bachelor's degree, newly minted and probably not worth more than about $35,000 a year.This right here is what is wrong with our model of education. You'd think the supposedly business-oriented libertards would know the simple adage you get what you pay for. If you don't think your teachers are worth a damn, you'll get teachers who aren't. There are really two kinds of teachers these days. Seriously dedicated teachers who are willing to take the shit sandwich that is our educational system, and people incompetent to do anything else. In other countries, ones that are beating us hollow in educating their citizens, teacher is considered one of the more prestigious professions. Here, apparently, despite all the grunting noises repigs make about "the kids," they seriously don't give a shit about our future.I love that they think some 23 year old college kid can control a class of 35. Even if he or she could there are much easier jobs for that kind of pay. It's obvious they've never observed a good teacher and seen how hard she works or they wouldn't think a good experienced teacher and a newly minted college graduate were interchangeable.

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#21

Post by Shagnastie » Sun Apr 07, 2013 12:33 am

Some GOOD education news from Texas for a change. :-bd There's been a major push on there for years from Perry and his appointees/cronies for school vouchers, backed by lots of proposed legislation and even visits from Jeb Bush :thumbsdown: on behalf of various private school corporations. But, miracle of miracles, on Thursday the Texas House passed an amendment to the state budget bill that precludes using state funds for vouchers:[/break1]dallasnews.com/2013/04/house-says-no-private-school-vouchers.html/]http://trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com/ ... hers.html/Even though practically every public education related organization strongly opposed vouchers, there was still a lot of fear some form of public funds for private schools would be approved. The final vote on the amendment was a strongly bi-partisan 103-43, a major slap-down for voucher supporters (too bad it didn't happen on Friday). Hopefully, this will lead to a reversal of some other negative trends in education in the Lone Star State. {SMILIES_PATH}/pray.gif

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#22

Post by Plutodog » Sun Apr 07, 2013 12:44 am

No doubt the bastids wuz informed that under the law, such public funds might be forced to be expended for some private Muslim school. Back to the drawing board... :roll:
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#23

Post by Shagnastie » Sun Apr 07, 2013 12:56 am

No doubt the bastids wuz informed that under the law, such public funds might be forced to be expended for some private Muslim school. Back to the drawing board... :roll:Yeah, that was actually brought up, but don't think the lege gave it much weight, except maybe the reps from over on the LA border. They've been very disturbed about how all the Cajuns are going Muslim with Jindal's vouchers. ALLAGATUH AKHBAR! :yikes:

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#24

Post by ZekeB » Sun Apr 07, 2013 10:53 am

They like to think of schools designed as what we here in Oregon refer to as "charter schools." Those schools are in the news a lot here. Generally in a negative light. Misfit teachers and administration seem to be issues. It makes me wonder where they get their pool of teachers from.
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#25

Post by magdalen77 » Sun Apr 07, 2013 2:53 pm

They like to think of schools designed as what we here in Oregon refer to as "charter schools." Those schools are in the news a lot here. Generally in a negative light. Misfit teachers and administration seem to be issues. It makes me wonder where they get their pool of teachers from.Charter schools seem to be a mixed bag in PA. Some are excellent with waiting lists and lotteries for admission, some are mediocre (you might as well stay in your neighborhood school) and some are lousy. It seems like the cyber schools are among the mediocre to lousy.

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