Social or International effects of COVID-19

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Suranis
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Social or International effects of COVID-19

#1

Post by Suranis »

This is for effects of the Pandemic that don't fit into direct effects of the disease, but are still there.

In this post, countries are starting to hoard food.
Countries Are Starting to Hoard Food, Threatening Global Trade
By Isis Almeida
and Agnieszka de Sousa
24 March 2020, 23:30 GMT

Some early bans on exports raise questions about protectionism
‘Without the food supply, societies just totally break’

It’s not just grocery shoppers who are hoarding pantry staples. Some governments are moving to secure domestic food supplies during the conoravirus pandemic.

Kazakhstan, one of the world’s biggest shippers of wheat flour, banned exports of that product along with others, including carrots, sugar and potatoes. Serbia has stopped the flow of its sunflower oil and other goods. Russia is leaving the door open to shipment bans and said it’s assessing the situation weekly.

To be perfectly clear, there have been just a handful of moves and no sure signs that much more is on the horizon. Still, what’s been happening has raised a question: Is this the start of a wave of food nationalism that will further disrupt supply chains and trade flows?
U.K. Grocers Ration Buying and Bulk Up Online to Deal With Virus

“We’re starting to see this happening already -- and all we can see is that the lockdown is going to get worse,” said Tim Benton, research director in emerging risks at think tank Chatham House in London.

Though food supplies are ample, logistical hurdles are making it harder to get products where they need to be as the coronavirus unleashes unprecedented measures, panic buying and the threat of labor crunches.

Consumers across the globe are still loading their pantries -- and the economic fallout from the virus is just starting. The specter of more trade restrictions is stirring memories of how protectionism can often end up causing more harm than good. That adage rings especially true now as the moves would be driven by anxiety and not made in response to crop failures or other supply problems.

As it is, many governments have employed extreme measures, setting curfews and limits on crowds or even on people venturing out for anything but to acquire essentials. That could spill over to food policy, said Ann Berg, an independent consultant and veteran agricultural trader who started her career at Louis Dreyfus Co. in 1974.

“You could see wartime rationing, price controls and domestic stockpiling,” she said.

Some nations are adding to their strategic reserves. China, the biggest rice grower and consumer, pledged to buy more than ever before from its domestic harvest, even though the government already holds massive stockpiles of rice and wheat, enough for one year of consumption.

Key wheat importers including Algeria and Turkey have also issued new tenders, and Morocco said a suspension on wheat-import duties would last through mid-June.
Food Dependence

Trade as a share of domestic food supply

Source: UN’s Food & Agriculture Organization Global Perspectives Studies

As governments take nationalistic approaches, they risk disrupting an international system that has become increasingly interconnected in recent decades.

Kazakhstan had already stopped exports of other food staples, like buckwheat and onions, before the move this week to cut off wheat-flour shipments. That latest action was a much bigger step, with the potential to affect companies around the world that rely on the supplies to make bread.

For some commodities, a handful of countries, or even fewer, make up the bulk of exportable supplies. Disruptions to those shipments would have major global ramifications. Take, for example, Russia, which has emerged as the world’s top wheat exporter and a key supplier to North Africa.

“If governments are not working collectively and cooperatively to ensure there is a global supply, if they’re just putting their nations first, you can end up in a situation where things get worse,” said Benton of Chatham House.

He warned that frenzied shopping coupled with protectionist policies could eventually lead to higher food prices -- a cycle that could end up perpetuating itself.

“If you’re panic buying on the market for next year’s harvest, then prices will go up, and as prices go up, policy makers will panic more,” he said.

And higher grocery bills can have major ramifications. Bread costs have a long history of kick-starting unrest and political instability. During the food price spikes of 2011 and 2008, there were food riots in more than 30 nations across Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

“Without the food supply, societies just totally break,” Benton said.
Ample supplies have kept prices relatively low since the 2011 spike

Unlike previous periods of rampant food inflation, global inventories of staple crops like corn, wheat, soybeans and rice are plentiful, said Dan Kowalski, vice president of research at CoBank, a $145 billion lender to the agriculture industry, adding he doesn’t expect “dramatic” gains for prices now.

While the spikes of the last decade were initially caused by climate problems for crops, policies exacerbated the consequences. In 2010, Russia experienced a record heat wave that damaged the wheat crop. The government responded by banning exports to make sure domestic consumers had enough.

The United Nations’ measure of global food prices reached a record high by February 2011.

“Given the problem that we are facing now, it’s not the moment to put these types of policies into place,” said Maximo Torero, chief economist at the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization. “On the contrary, it’s the moment to cooperate and coordinate.”

Of course, the few bans in place may not last, and signs of a return to normal could prevent countries from taking drastic measures. Once consumers start to see more products on shelves, they may stop hoarding, in turn allowing governments to back off. X5 Retail, Russia’s biggest grocer, said demand for staple foods is starting to stabilize. In the U.S., major stores like Walmart Inc. have cut store hours to allow workers to restock.

In the meantime, some food prices have already started going up because of the spike in buying.

Wheat futures in Chicago, the global benchmark, have climbed more than 6% in March as consumers buy up flour. U.S. wholesale beef has shot up to the highest since 2015, and egg prices are higher.

At the same time, the U.S. dollar is surging against a host of emerging-market currencies. That reduces purchasing power for countries that ship in commodities, which are usually priced in greenbacks.

In the end, whenever there’s a disruption for whatever reason, Berg said, “it’s the least-developed countries with weak currencies that get hurt the most.”
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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#2

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The Guardian: Trump privately appeals to Asia and Europe for medical help to fight coronavirus

Despite president’s rhetoric that the US would not rely on foreign nations for help, the administration has approached European and Asian partners ...

On Tuesday, Trump spoke by phone with the South Korean president, Moon Jae-in, asking if his country could supply medical equipment. ...

“Depending on critical needs, the United States could seek to purchase many of these items in the hundreds of millions with purchases of higher end equipment such as ventilators in the hundreds of thousands,” an email sent to embassies in Europe and Eurasia said. ...

On March 18, the Defense One military news site reported that the US air force had quietly flown half a million nasal swabs from Italy to Memphis, where they were distributed around the country.
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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#3

Post by RTH10260 »

Well well well...

How stupid is this person really?

I intended to reply elsewhere to the quote of his tweet of offering Iran and N.Korea test kits that he doesn't even have for his very own country.

The allies will have taken note of this, that he never thought of offering test kits to the most hit European countries like Italy, Spain or France.

The internet never forgets, neither do diplomats!

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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#4

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Newsweek: Cuba Uses 'Wonder Drug' to Fight Coronavirus Around World Despite U.S. Sanctions

Cuba has mobilized its medical corps around the world to distribute a new "wonder drug" that officials there say is capable of treating the new coronavirus despite the United States' strict sanctions that continue to pressure the communist-run island.

The drug, called Interferon Alpha-2B Recombinant (IFNrec), is jointly developed by scientists from Cuba and China, where the coronavirus COVID-19 disease outbreak first emerged late last year. Already active in China since January, the Cuban Medical Brigades began deploying to dozens of nations, providing personnel and products such as its new anti-viral drug to battle the disease that has exceeded 400,000 confirmed cases across the globe. As of Tuesday, over 100,000 people have recovered from the infection and more than 18,000 have died.

Cuba first used advanced interferon techniques to treat dengue fever in the 1980s and later found success in using it to combat HIV, human papillomavirus, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and other diseases. The use of Interferon Alpha-2B Recombinant "prevents aggravation and complications in patients reaching that stage that ultimately can result in death," Cuban biotech expert Luis Herrera Martinez said, according to a recent Yale University Press Blog feature written by the University of Glasgow's Helen Yaffe. She called the treatment a potential "wonder drug" against the new coronavirus.

Yaffe, who recently authored a book on Cuba's post-Soviet economic experience entitled We Are Cuba!, told Newsweek that she knew of at least 15 countries that have contacted Cuba to request the drug, along with "local mayors and hospital directors who are anxious to get hold of the Cuban anti-viral to meet the crisis." Interferon Alpha-2B Recombinant has not been approved to treat COVID-19, but has been proven effective against viruses similar to it.
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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#5

Post by Volkonski »

Julian Borger
@julianborger
· 36m
According to Der Spiegel, the G7 foreign ministers haven't been able to agree on a joint statement because of Pompeo's insistence it refer to #coronavirus as the "Wuhan virus". Pompeo did not deny that this morning - said G7 don't agree on everything

https://spiegel.de/politik/ausland/stre ... eabf53f6b4
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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#6

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Brazil’s Bolsonaro, channeling Trump, dismisses coronavirus measures — it’s just ‘a little cold’

Terrence McCoy and Heloísa Traiano
March 25, 2020 at 11:23 p.m. GMT+1

RIO DE JANEIRO — He said self-isolation was “mass confinement.” He called the novel coronavirus a “little cold.” He asked, if only people older than 60 are at risk, “why close the schools?”

This was Jair Bolsonaro, leader of Latin America’s largest country, calling on Brazilians to return to jobs, public spaces and commerce amid the coronavirus pandemic, contradicting not only his own health officials, but also the global consensus on how to see countries through the pandemic without a crippling loss of life.

Brazil’s densely packed favelas brace for coronavirus: ‘It will kill a lot of people.’

It was a portrait of Bolsonaro isolated and unbound: Alone before the camera, attacking the media, undermining political opponents, indulging talking points he’s used since the crisis began even as the disturbing reality overtook his sanguine predictions.

“Most of the media has been countervailing,” he declared in a national address Tuesday. “They spread the sensation of dread, with their flagship the high number of victims in Italy. The perfect scenario to be used by the media to spread hysteria.”

An image of Bolsonaro and the words “#OUT BOLSONARO” is projected on a building in Sao Paulo during his address Tuesday.
An image of Bolsonaro and the words “#OUT BOLSONARO” is projected on a building in Sao Paulo during his address Tuesday. (Amanda Perobelli/Reuters)
“In my particular case,” the 65-year-old former army officer added, “with my history as an athlete, if I were infected by the virus, I wouldn’t need to worry. I wouldn’t feel anything or, if very affected, it would be like a little flu or little cold.”

Rather than calming panic and confusion, Bolsonaro’s pronouncements appear to be only fueling them. As confirmed cases and deaths mount — Brazil leads Latin America in both — fear is growing over whether the country’s institutions and leaders will rise to the challenge of a historic moment, with far less room for error than wealthier countries already in the full grip of coronavirus.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/th ... story.html

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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#7

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Wall Street Journal - (Paywall): Coronavirus Cases Surpass 60,000 in U.S.; Spain Death Toll Overtakes China

U.S. has third-highest infections after China and Italy; Spain fatalities top 3,434

"The number of confirmed cases of the new coronavirus in the U.S. surpassed 60,000, led by a continued surge of infections in New York, as lawmakers worked to soften the economic consequences of the pandemic that has shut down wide swaths of the country.

World-wide there were more than 458,000 cases Wednesday, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. More than 20,800 people have died, and in a grim milestone, Spain on Wednesday surpassed China's death toll from the virus. Infections in Italy rose to 74,386, closing..."
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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#8

Post by Foggy »

In other words, we'd have 150,000 cases if DeSantis allowed testing. :doh:
For more information, read it again.

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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#9

Post by Chilidog »

Foggy wrote:
Thu Mar 26, 2020 7:48 am
In other words, we'd have 150,000 cases if DeSantis allowed testing. :doh:
https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

Sort the column for active cases.

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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#10

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Work from home extended to mid-April from end of March.

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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#11

Post by Slim Cognito »

Foggy wrote:
Thu Mar 26, 2020 7:48 am
In other words, we'd have 150,000 cases if DeSantis allowed testing. :doh:
Bingo!
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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#12

Post by Volkonski »

Austin Ramzy
@austinramzy
·
6m
China to temporarily bar entry by foreigners with valid visas, residence permits starting Saturday. Big step in response to coronavirus spread, and follows China’s complaints of the US restricting entry in January https://fmprc.gov.cn/web/wjbxw_673019/t1761858.shtml
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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#13

Post by Volkonski »

I doubt there are many Canadians who want to enter the USA just now.

Trump looking to put troops near Canadian border amid coronavirus fears

https://globalnews.ca/news/6735064/coro ... us-border/
While the move would be temporary — lasting only as long as the coronavirus pandemic — some in Washington are concerned about Canadian reaction and the precedent set by sending troops to their northern and southern borders, sources told Global News.

If the plans come to fruition, Global News has learned troops would be stationed about 30 kilometres from the border between official points of entry and would use sensor technology to detect irregular crossers before passing on the information to border patrol agents.

Under the proposed scenario, the troops would not have the authority to arrest or detain anyone, sources say. Instead, border patrol agents would be sent to intercept the irregular crossers.

United States law prohibits its military from acting as domestic law enforcement, instead only allowing troops to serve in a support role within its own borders.
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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#14

Post by Volkonski »

COVID-19 creates divided states of America

https://www.chron.com/coronavirus/artic ... =sftwitter
Florida has a message for New Yorkers: Please don't visit. And if you do, prepare to sit in quarantine or risk jail.

Hawaii, another state that thrives on tourism, is asking tourists to stay away for a month.

And Alaska is requiring a 14-day quarantine for anyone entering that state from, as Alaskans put it, "outside."

It is a rare circumstance in the United States, a country where travel between states is generally welcome and often only noticed in counts of tourism visits, that states are suddenly looking for ways to discourage residents of other states from coming into theirs.
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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#15

Post by RVInit »

It's just a way of pretending that we don't have a problem as long as you don't come visit us.
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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#16

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The U.S. is sending migrant children back to their home countries, citing new policies aimed at stopping the virus.

Central American minors arriving alone at the United States border are being swiftly returned to their home countries without the usual legal processes under the government’s new locked-down border policy aimed at containing the spread of the virus.

As part of the recent closure of the borders to all but essential traffic, a Customs and Border Protection spokesman initially said that young migrants traveling without an adult guardian would be exempted from the new policy, and admitted to shelters run by the Department of Health and Human Services.

But on Thursday, Tony Barker, a different spokesman for the agency, said that migrant children were being quickly returned to their home countries on a “case by case basis,” rather than being admitted and considered for asylum in the United States.

The new practice marks a significant change in border policy that could return children and teenagers to unsafe conditions in their home countries without the legal protections normally afforded under asylum law.


part of https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/26/worl ... -news.html

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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#17

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Excellent article on how people in different countries and cultures are dealing with the pandemic. I want more like this — we are all in this together.

Cologne Sanitizer, Boxed Wine and Bidets: How People in 68 Countries Are Coping With Coronavirus
In Finland, they’re drinking boxed wine and playing Korona, a board game. In Greece, they’re stockpiling feta. The French refuse to stop kissing. ISIS is telling its members to avoid traveling to Europe to conduct attacks. And, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, hand-washing stations are everywhere; they know the drill.

As the novel coronavirus continues spreading, the whole world is preparing for the onslaught in similar ways—social distancing, working from home, panic buying at grocery stores. But people in different countries are also weathering this crisis in different ways, finding, for example, different products to hoard, different ways to pass the time, different people to blame and even different things to worry about.

Over the past week, I emailed, texted and contacted via Facebook friends around the world—including a network of acquaintances and colleagues I’ve built over 20 years working in foreign policy, living in Europe and traveling widely—and asked them to tell me about their lives under coronavirus watch: items in scarce supply, coping mechanisms, jokes and the effect of culture and history on national responses. In total, I heard from more than 90 people in 68 countries, all of whom sent me anecdotes, press clips and Twitter videos providing a snapshot of life in mid-March under COVID-19. Here’s what I’ve learned so far.
https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/ ... rus-140648
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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#18

Post by Lani »

RVInit wrote:
Thu Mar 26, 2020 2:32 pm
It's just a way of pretending that we don't have a problem as long as you don't come visit us.
Don't have to pretend. Remote locations have limited supplies and medical care. My home has a population of about 75,000. We have 100,000-140,000 visitors each month. There are 111 licensed beds, 9 ICU beds and 18 ventilators plus a shortage of medical professionals.

There is sufficient food and other goods for about 7 days. If the cargo barges are slowed due to covid19, we're in even more trouble.

On my island, we have 5 documented people with covid19. 4 visitors, 1 returning resident. The first 2 ill visitors have recovered and returned home. No community spread so far.

Tourism had already dropped 87% before mandatory incoming isolation. The suffering of hospitality workers is heartbreaking. However, if the state hadn't taken strong action to curb tourism, and if the virus spreads, there simply isn't going to be sufficient medical care and other basics like food.

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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#19

Post by Volkonski »

US seeks medical staff from abroad for COVID-19 fight

https://www.aa.com.tr/en/americas/us-se ... ht/1781448
The U.S. Department of State announced on Thursday night that it is looking to hire international medical staff to handle the increasing number of coronavirus cases in the country.

“We encourage medical professionals seeking work in the U.S. on a work or exchange visitor visa (H or J), particularly those working on #COVID19 issues, to contact the nearest U.S. Embassy/ Consulate for a visa appointment,” said a tweet by the Bureau of Consular Affairs.

The U.S. is now the coronavirus infection capital of the world, after surpassing China and Italy last night, with 85,991 confirmed cases, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

Particularly those working to treat or mitigate the effects of COVID-19 were encouraged to reach out to the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate to request a visa appointment, the statement added.
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#20

Post by Volkonski »

We may get a chance to see what happens when a country makes no attempt to slow the Coronavirus. :(

Jair Bolsonaro claims Brazilians 'never catch anything' as Covid-19 cases rise

https://www.theguardian.com/global-deve ... cases-rise
Brazil’s president Jair Bolsonaro has tried to reassure his citizens over the threat of coronavirus by claiming Brazilians can bathe in excrement “and nothing happens”.

As Brazil’s Covid-19 death toll rose to 77, Bolsonaro scotched the idea Latin America’s biggest economy could soon face a situation as severe as the United States, where there have been more than 1,000 deaths and more than 83,000 cases.

:snippity:

A report in the Folha de São Paulo, a leading Brazilian broadsheet, suggested there had been a “vertiginous” rise in the number of people being admitted to hospital with severe respiratory failure since late February when the Covid-19 case was detected.

“In the last two weeks there has been an explosion … possibly because of coronavirus,” a researcher from Fiocruz, Brazil’s leading biomedical research centre, told the newspaper, describing an “unprecedented” situation.
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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#21

Post by RVInit »

Lani wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 4:23 am
RVInit wrote:
Thu Mar 26, 2020 2:32 pm
It's just a way of pretending that we don't have a problem as long as you don't come visit us.
Don't have to pretend. Remote locations have limited supplies and medical care. My home has a population of about 75,000. We have 100,000-140,000 visitors each month. There are 111 licensed beds, 9 ICU beds and 18 ventilators plus a shortage of medical professionals.

There is sufficient food and other goods for about 7 days. If the cargo barges are slowed due to covid19, we're in even more trouble.

On my island, we have 5 documented people with covid19. 4 visitors, 1 returning resident. The first 2 ill visitors have recovered and returned home. No community spread so far.

Tourism had already dropped 87% before mandatory incoming isolation. The suffering of hospitality workers is heartbreaking. However, if the state hadn't taken strong action to curb tourism, and if the virus spreads, there simply isn't going to be sufficient medical care and other basics like food.
Lani, I am so sorry that I wasn't more specific about what I was posting about. YES, I get it, and I feel awful about how you must have perceived my post.

I was specifically responding to a post about Florida and really was not even remotely thinking about anything other than that. I live in Florida. We have a government that is trying to pretend like nothing is happening here and I was being sarcastic about the fact that now they are worried about people coming here - at the same time they are encouraging business as usual when we already have the virus here.

I apologize for any rise in blood pressure my post must have caused. :oops: :oops: :oops:
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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#22

Post by Lani »

Sorry right back at you. I wasn't thinking about Florida. Just Alaska & Hawaii because we're isolated and needed services are so limited.

It was painful to accept that we had to lock down fast because we are defenseless if covid19 hits us hard. It meant a lot of people would quickly lose their jobs or their businesses, perhaps forever. :brokenheart: So I'm very sad. But we did it, and so far it's working. Only island with no community spread - so far. Although this place sometimes drives me nutz, the powerful sense of community keeps me here.

Earlier I was reading up on Florida. Only about .5% of covid cases in Florida are nonresidents, so your governor is full of shit complaining about New Yorkers showing up. Florida's numbers are rapidly rising. Think he'll finally order shelter in place?

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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#23

Post by RVInit »

Lani wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 8:16 am
Sorry right back at you. I wasn't thinking about Florida. Just Alaska & Hawaii because we're isolated and needed services are so limited.

It was painful to accept that we had to lock down fast because we are defenseless if covid19 hits us hard. It meant a lot of people would quickly lose their jobs or their businesses, perhaps forever. :brokenheart: So I'm very sad. But we did it, and so far it's working. Only island with no community spread - so far. Although this place sometimes drives me nutz, the powerful sense of community keeps me here.

Earlier I was reading up on Florida. Only about .5% of covid cases in Florida are nonresidents, so your governor is full of shit complaining about New Yorkers showing up. Florida's numbers are rapidly rising. Think he'll finally order shelter in place?
It's hard to say what DeSantis will do. On some things he has actually surprised me. But, this is one of those things that Trump has his ego very tightly tied up in, so I think the red state governors are all going to toe the line, unfortunately. They are basically recommending people 65 and over to practice social distancing, etc.

I don't trust information coming from the state of Florida and I will tell you why. Some of you may know that I am currently in a second career. What prompted me to leave the love of my life career was once Rick Scott became governor I was forced with having to make a decision to keep my job but had to lie to the public about climate change, sea level rise, etc. I simply couldn't do it. At first I was like many people that Trump is surrounded by who think they can keep their own ethical standards and self respect in place while still serving. Ultimately I found it impossible to do that and sadly left a career that I loved and actually believe I made lasting contributions to saving fairly significant public lands with fail safe funding. But I digress and it's not good for my mental health to go there. My life is different now.

But DeSantis? I don't think he's as vile as Rick Scott. But that's not saying much.
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Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#24

Post by Slim Cognito »

RVInit wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 8:32 am


But DeSantis? I don't think he's as vile as Rick Scott. But that's not saying much.
Agreed. At least DeSantis is trying to address our red tide/green algae situation and we did see improvements last summer. Funny, problems that hurt republicans as much as democrats gets dealt with, isn't it? That doesn't mean I like the trump stooge, and he is a big one. But at least he didn't steal millions from Medicare.

Rick Scott makes my head explode.
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Volkonski
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Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: Social or International effects of COVID-19

#25

Post by Volkonski »

Coronavirus Heroes Are Getting Tossed From Their Homes by Scared Landlords

https://www.thedailybeast.com/coronavir ... itter_page
Anna Jones* had just finished her shift at St. Rose Hospital in Las Vegas, where she works as an emergency-room nurse, when she received an email from her landlord labeled “Quick Action Needed.” Her landlord—a quiet, older woman who lived downstairs from Jones and her husband—informed her that she would need to vacate the premises within 24 hours. The reason, she said, was COVID-19.

“I don’t want interaction or debate over this decision,” the landlord wrote in emails reviewed by The Daily Beast. “I’m sorry for the abrupt notice, but given the situation, it’s the choice I’m making to protect myself.”

:snippity:

Kadey Carter, a travel nurse in Missouri, told The Daily Beast that multiple Airbnb hosts had canceled her reservations in recent weeks after learning she was a nurse. “They’re apologetic but they’re just like, ‘basically for our protection right now, we’re not comfortable with that,’” she said.

In interviews with The Daily Beast, multiple nurses described potential landlords backing out of rental agreements, Airbnb hosts denying their requests, and current proprietors turning them out on the street. The Daily Beast is using pseudonyms or not identifying some of them because they are still in negotiations with their landlords.
Maybe hospitals will have to build staff housing.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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