Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

Post Reply

After Kavanaugh, What Will Happen In The Midterms?

Democrats Win House, GOP Keeps Senate
22
69%
GOP Keeps House, Democrats Win Senate
0
No votes
GOP Keeps House and Senate
5
16%
Democrats Win House and Senate
4
13%
Something Else
1
3%
 
Total votes: 32

User avatar
Orlylicious
Posts: 10453
Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2012 4:02 pm
Location: With Pete Buttigieg and the other "open and defiant homosexuals" --Bryan Fischer AFA
Occupation: "Do Nothing Democrat Savage" -- Donald, 9/28/19 and "Scalawag...Part of an extreme, malicious leftist internet social mob working in concert with weaponized, socialized governments to target and injure political opponents.” -- Walt Fitzpatrick

Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#1

Post by Orlylicious » Sat Oct 06, 2018 2:07 am

The Senate is on all night, CSPAN2 is running it, at 2:30am it's Sen Brian Schatz.

One of the worst things to me about the GOP is they have totally lost any grace or graciousness, they are so excited to say Democrats lost they don't realize what this conservative court is going to do to take away their rights. Now the GOP base got what they wanted. Unlimited Chick-Fil-A and no more gay wedding cakes. And oh yeah, overturning Roe v Wade which Donald has said a bunch of times, it's no surprise. The SCOTUS October caseload was designed for max impact.
Criminal cases in the October 2018 term: A law professor’s dream
Rory Little Criminal Law
Posted Tue, September 18th, 2018 4:06 pm

Applying a broad definition, 13 of the 38 cases in which the Supreme Court has granted review for the upcoming October 2018 term raise criminal law and related issues. (A few more will be granted in the “long conference” order list to be released September 27.) This is about average: Between a quarter to a third of cases decided by the court every year are criminal-law-related. But this term the docket feels a bit special: As I explained to the American Bar Association in my “Annual Review of the Supreme Court’s Term, Criminal Cases” last month, October Term 2018 might be described as a criminal law professor’s dream.
http://www.scotusblog.com/2018/09/crimi ... ors-dream/

Will the GOP base stay motivated through election day? Can Donald and Fox News keep them juiced? Or will reasonable Americans come forward and say NO MORE? If the vast majority who are disgusted and offended would get out and vote against Republicans, it could be 2006 again.








And not just Congress: the Governors and legislative seats could be a wipeout for the GOP and erase all the gains during the Obama years.

As angry as people are about Bart, best thing for the party would be to get past this and get back to the winning issues that were moving Democratic candidates forward: Healthcare, fair wages, education and other pocketbook issues. The longer Bart keeps going, the less time to get to other issues.

Here are Early Voting dates for each state. People are already voting! California starts tomorrow. Of course thanks to Rick Scott and the GOP legislature, Florida doesn't start until October 27 to suppress voting. For the "more information" visit https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/201 ... tions.html
How to Vote Early in the 2018 Midterm Elections
By ISABELLA GRULLÓN PAZ and MARGARET KRAMER OCT. 4, 2018

Many Americans will cast their ballots in voting booths on Nov. 6. But for some, voting begins far earlier. The dates below list the early voting dates for each of the states that allow it.

SEPT. 20
Wisconsin
In-person absentee ballots can be submitted up to 47 days before the election, but start dates vary by municipality. Deadline for absentee ballots is the sunday before the election but also may vary by municipality. More information »

SEPT. 21
Minnesota
Voters can submit an absentee ballot in person as early as 46 days before the election and as late as Nov. 5. More information »

South Dakota
Voters can submit an absentee ballot in person as early as 46 days before the election and as late as Election Day. Early voting dates may vary by county. More information »

SEPT. 22
Maine
Early voting generally begins 30-45 days before an election and ends on Election Day. Early voting dates may vary by county. More information »

New Jersey
Early voting generally begins as early as 45 days before an election and ends as late as Nov. 5. Early voting dates may vary by county. More information »

Vermont
Early voting generally begins as early as 45 days before an election and ends as late as Election Day. Voters can submit their ballot in person or by mail via an absentee ballot. Early voting dates may vary by county. More information »

SEPT. 27
Wyoming
Voters can submit an absentee ballot in person as early as 40 days before the election and as late as Election Day. Early voting dates may vary by county. More information »

North Dakota
Through Nov. 5. More information »

OCT. 7
California
Early voting generally begins 30 days before the election, but specific dates vary by county. Early voting end dates also vary by county. More information »

Nebraska
Voters can submit an absentee ballot in person as early as 30 days before the election and as late as Election Day. Early voting dates may vary by county. More information »

OCT. 8
Iowa
Voters can submit an absentee ballot as early as 29 days before the election at the county auditors' office. More information »

OCT. 9
Montana
Voters can pick up an absentee ballot in person as early as 28 days before the election and return it by Election Day More information »

OCT. 10
Indiana
Voters can submit an absentee ballot in person as early as 27 days before the election and as late as noon on Nov. 5. More information »

Ohio
Early in-person voting during weekdays up until the weekend before Election Day, when voters can also submit a ballot on Saturday and Sunday. More information »

Arizona
Early ballots are mailed More information »

OCT. 15
Georgia
Early voting begins Oct. 15 and continues to Nov. 2. More information »

OCT. 17
Tennessee
Early voting beings 20 days before the election and continues to Nov. 1. More information »

North Carolina
Voters can submit an absentee ballot in person as early as 20 days before the election and as late as Nov. 3. Registered voters will be able to stop at any designated absentee voting site in their counties. More information »

Oregon
Oregon voters recieve a ballot in the mail. The first day to mail ballots is Oct. 17. Nov. 6 is the last day to drop off ballots at County Clerk's office. More information »

OCT. 19
Washington
Washington state has an 18 day voting period that starts on Oct 19. Drop boxes close on Nov. 6 at 8:00 p.m. Some my recive their ballot no later than Oct 25. More information »

OCT. 20
New Mexico
Voters can submit a ballot in person as early as 17 days before the election and as late as Nov. 3. Early voting dates may vary by county. More information »

Nevada
Through Nov. 2. More information »

OCT. 22
Alaska
Voters can submit a ballot in person as early as 15 days before the election. Early voting dates may vary by county. More information »

Arkansas
Voters can submit a ballot in person as early as 15 days before the election and as late as Nov. 5. Early voting dates may vary by county. More information »

District of Columbia
Early voting begins specifically for One Judiciary Square. Voters can submit an in-person ballot 15 days before the election. Outside of this location, ballots can be submitted 10 days before the election (Oct. 27). Early voting ends on Nov. 5. More information »

Idaho
Early voting can begin as late as 15 days before the election, but start dates may be earlier and vary by county. Early voting ends on Nov. 2. More information »

Illinois
Voters can submit an absentee ballot in person as early as 15 days before the election and as late as Nov. 5. More information »

Massachusetts
Voters can submit a ballot in person as early as 15 days before the election and as late as Nov. 2. More information »

Texas
Voters can submit a ballot in person as early as 15 days before the election and as late as Nov. 2. Registered voters will be able to stop at any designated early voting site in their counties. More information »

OCT. 23
Hawaii
Voters can submit a ballot in person as early as 14 days before the election and as late as Nov. 3. Early voting dates may vary by county. More information »

Louisiana
Through Oct. 30, with the exception of Sunday, Oct. 28. More information »

Utah
Through Nov. 2. More information »

OCT. 24
West Virginia
Through Nov. 3 More information »

OCT. 25
Maryland
Through Nov. 1 More information »

OCT. 27
Florida
Through Nov. 3. More information »

OCT. 30
Colorado
Colorado voters receive a ballot in the mail, and in-person voting starts at least 7 days before the election, but start dates may vary by county. In-person voting ends on Election Day. More information »

Kansas
Early voting must begin at least 7 days before the election, but start dates may vary by county and can be as many as 20 days in advance of the election. Early voting ends Nov. 5. More information »

NOV. 1
Oklahoma
Voters can cast a ballot at their local county election office Thursday and Friday prior to the election from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday before the election from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Early voting ends on Nov. 4.


Does the Kavanaugh charade motivate you one way or another? What do you think the aftermath will be? :boxing: :boxing: :boxing:


Photo: Merry Christmas from the titular Mama June. Santa (aka Sugar Bear) and her lovely family!
Hey! Don't miss The Fogbow's Favorite TV Show starring the titular Mama June Shannon -- "Mama June: From Not To Hot!"

User avatar
Orlylicious
Posts: 10453
Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2012 4:02 pm
Location: With Pete Buttigieg and the other "open and defiant homosexuals" --Bryan Fischer AFA
Occupation: "Do Nothing Democrat Savage" -- Donald, 9/28/19 and "Scalawag...Part of an extreme, malicious leftist internet social mob working in concert with weaponized, socialized governments to target and injure political opponents.” -- Walt Fitzpatrick

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#2

Post by Orlylicious » Sun Oct 07, 2018 2:17 am

POLITICO is on this question...
Anger vs. elation: Parties scrap for Kavanaugh edge in midterms
'Anger always lasts longer than happiness,' says one top Democratic pollster.
By JAMES ARKIN 10/06/2018 06:33 PM EDT

Republicans’ vigorous defense of Brett Kavanaugh jolted the GOP base and boosted the party's spirits heading into the midterms. But sustaining that momentum through Election Day won't be easy. The “Brett bounce,” as some Republican operatives have referred to it, coincided with the moment when voters began to tune into the midterm elections in earnest. Several Republican Senate campaigns began airing TV ads and aggressively fundraising off the Kavanaugh fight, while attempting to spin it into a larger argument about control in Washington and the threat to President Donald Trump if Democrats win.

But Democrats say their voters are equally galvanized. Anger on the left is high after Republicans muscled Kavanaugh through in the face of sexual assault allegations against him. Protesters have stormed Capitol Hill in recent weeks aiming to pressure swing votes on both sides of the aisle. The operative question after Kavanaugh's confirmation: Which side's energy will be more intense and sustained over the next month?
***
Bolger said the intensified Republican base might help the party in rural House districts and areas Trump won in 2016, where Republican turnout can counteract Democratic enthusiasm if the base stays engaged over the next four weeks. But in suburban districts where independent and moderate Republican voters had already been moving away from the party given their antipathy for Trump, the Supreme Court clash could accelerate the party’s troubles. “If you're in a Republican district and you see a lot [of] barns, you're in good shape,” Bolger said. “If you're in Republican district and you see a lot of cul-de-sacs, you should be more nervous.”
***
Gregg Keller, a veteran Republican operative in the state, said Hawley has seen a significant bump from the increased Republican enthusiasm. He pointed to a Republican poll conducted by a pro-Hawley super PAC this week showing him leading by 8 percentage points -- Hawley’s best showing of the cycle, though it’s at odds with recent public data. The surge came because Republicans were galvanized by the court, Keller said, adding that Democrats who dismiss the enthusiasm as a temporary “sugar high” are misreading the political environment. "It's Republicans who were not going to vote in the midterm election now being willing to crawl over glass to vote in the election,” he said. [Note: I think that's spin but I like and encourage all the talk of fake polls, red waves and no chance Rs lose, let them be overconfiedent and stay home :P ]
***
Alex Conant, a former top aide to Sen. Marco Rubio, pointed out that a little more than a month ago, the investigations into Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and lawyer Michael Cohen were headline news. The four weeks between Kavanaugh’s confirmation vote and Election Day is a political eternity, Conant said. Republicans need to run TV ads on Kavanaugh to continue to stoke their voters’ anger and avoid distractions.
Lots more with specific races including Missouri: https://www.politico.com/story/2018/10/ ... act-877372


Photo: Merry Christmas from the titular Mama June. Santa (aka Sugar Bear) and her lovely family!
Hey! Don't miss The Fogbow's Favorite TV Show starring the titular Mama June Shannon -- "Mama June: From Not To Hot!"

User avatar
Lani
Posts: 4908
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 4:01 pm
Location: Some island in the Pacific

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#3

Post by Lani » Sun Oct 07, 2018 4:00 am

After Kavanaugh's Soros conspiracy rant, Trump immediately took the same stance at his next rally. I believe that was planned, not a coincidence. We'll be hearing continuously about millions paid to professional protestors & crisis actors, lock her up (HRC, Pelosi, Dr. Ford, etc.), best economy evah, Dems want to destroy Medicare, and on and on. There will be more violence associated with the rallies than in 2016. Voter suppression will be on overdrive. The election computers are already hacked.

Yes, I am a doomseer. :geezerette:


Insert signature here: ____________________________________________________

User avatar
Lani
Posts: 4908
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 4:01 pm
Location: Some island in the Pacific

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#4

Post by Lani » Sun Oct 07, 2018 5:52 am

Rebecca Ballhaus

@rebeccaballhaus
Trump on AF1 was asked about women angry about Kavanaugh’s confirmation.

“I don’t think they are,” he said. Women are “extremely happy," he said, “because they’re thinking of their sons, they’re thinking of their husbands and their brothers, their uncles, and others.”

12:18 PM - Oct 6, 2018



Insert signature here: ____________________________________________________

User avatar
Sluffy1
Posts: 492
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2015 4:35 pm

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#5

Post by Sluffy1 » Sun Oct 07, 2018 8:43 am

“because they’re thinking of their sons, they’re thinking of their husbands and their brothers, their uncles, and others.”
Too soon for a #MenToo so all these husbands,brothers, uncles and Others can tell the stories of ruined lives by false accusations.

Any men of Fowbow care to share their stories?



User avatar
Addie
Posts: 36128
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:22 am
Location: downstairs

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#6

Post by Addie » Sun Oct 07, 2018 11:53 am

WaPo - Michael Scherer and Robert Costa
‘Rock bottom’: Supreme Court fight reveals a country on the brink

When Christine Blasey Ford accused Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh of sexual assault last month, she did more than open herself up to unwanted scrutiny. She held up a mirror to a country in crisis, revealing its political players and embattled institutions not for what they claimed to be but for what they really are.

The painful 20-day passion play that followed — staged in committee rooms, Senate floor debates, hallway protests and millions of private conversations — did little to alter the future makeup of the Supreme Court. Now-Justice Kavanaugh was narrowly confirmed Saturday by the Senate, 50-48, in a vote that tracked expectations from the summer, with only one Democrat and one Republican defecting from the party line.

But few of the players emerged from the process unchanged or unblemished, underscoring the uncharted territory of deepening distrust and polarization that now defines the American system. The events further distanced the Senate Judiciary Committee from its nearly forgotten bipartisan traditions and raised new questions about the potential for the Supreme Court to maintain an independent authority outside the maelstrom of politics.

Public denunciations of the continuing slide were frequent and bipartisan, while political strategists and lawmakers raised new alarms about the ominous implications. Even top Republicans were downbeat on Saturday afternoon as the vote neared, cognizant of the cost of the political and cultural reckoning that had been sparked alongside the confirmation process.



User avatar
Orlylicious
Posts: 10453
Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2012 4:02 pm
Location: With Pete Buttigieg and the other "open and defiant homosexuals" --Bryan Fischer AFA
Occupation: "Do Nothing Democrat Savage" -- Donald, 9/28/19 and "Scalawag...Part of an extreme, malicious leftist internet social mob working in concert with weaponized, socialized governments to target and injure political opponents.” -- Walt Fitzpatrick

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#7

Post by Orlylicious » Sun Oct 07, 2018 4:20 pm

Don't get psyched out by the GOP! Channel your anger and disappointment... unlike 2016, this time we have a vote in 30 days! Don't take the bait from the GOP, head down, register voters, make calls (lots of candidates have national phone banking), show up for rallies, talk to friends, and keep the enthusiasm that we've had all year!

1. New Voter Registrations are hugely Democratic: A Record 800,000 People Registered to Vote on National Voter Registration Day http://time.com/5411948/national-voter- ... elections/
In Colorado, for instance, the first eight months of this year saw 97,157 people added to the voter rolls, a 233 percent increase over this same period of time in 2014, when there were only 29,133 voters added to the rolls. Further, 50,256 of these registrations — 52 percent — were Coloradans aged 18-40. And the Republican Party not only saw the total number of registered voters in the state decline, but particularly among women 18-40.

Another example is in Minnesota: Steven Dennis, the secretary of state, tweeted on Sept. 7 that the state has seen 52,644 new voters register so far in 2018, and 67.6 percent of them are 18-30. The overall number of new voter registrations is more than double from the same period of 2014.

In Iowa, 2018 voter registrations so far are double what they were at the same point in 2014. Even more telling is the partisan breakdown: Democrats added 23,064 new members so far this year and Republicans only 1,636. By comparison, Republicans added 91,010 members in 2014 and 35,525 in 2010, when Democrats lost 3,091 and 23,242 members respectively. With a close gubernatorial race and all three GOP-held House seats ranked as competitive by both Cook Political Report and Larry Sabato’s Crystal Ball, Iowa is yet another state where Republicans have the wind in their faces.
https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/v ... ncna915416

2. Bart O'Kavanaugh is the least popular Justice in modern history:
Brett Kavanaugh is the least popular Supreme Court nominee in 30 years
Analysis by Harry Enten, CNN
Updated 8:10 AM ET, Sat September 22, 2018

(CNN)Poll of the week: A new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll finds that 34% of Americans support the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, while 38% are opposed.
This poll is in line with a recent poll from Gallup in which 39% of Americans were for confirmation and 42% were opposed.
What's the point: Kavanaugh is the least liked Supreme Court nominee since Robert Bork in 1987.
Bart Poll.JPG
3. There's still time to register in many states! How many can we get registered? Registration Deadlines:
How to Register to Vote: Deadlines for Each State
By Isabella Grullón Paz and Margaret Kramer
Oct. 6, 2018

Election Day is Nov. 6, but voter registration deadlines in many states are well before that. So far, no deadlines have passed, though many are close.

Here’s a list of each state’s voter registration deadline. The mail deadlines are when the applications should be postmarked, unless stated otherwise. Some states allow you to register through Election Day, but may have special requirements to do so.

Alabama: The deadline to register in person, online or by mail is Oct. 22.

Alaska: The deadline to register in person, online or by mail is Oct. 7.

Arizona: The deadline to register in person, online or by mail is Oct. 9.

Arkansas: The deadline to register in person or by mail is Oct. 9. Online registration is not available.

California: The deadline to register in person, online or by mail is Oct. 22. Residents who miss the deadline can still register at an election office and vote with a provisional ballot. The vote will be counted when the registration is verified.

Colorado: The deadline to register by mail or online is Oct. 29. Residents can register in person by Election Day.

Connecticut: The deadline to register in person, by mail or online is Oct. 30. Residents can still register to vote through Election Day at a local election office.

Delaware: The deadline to register in person, online or by mail is Oct. 13.

District of Columbia: The deadline to register in person is Election Day. The deadline to register by mail or online is Oct. 16.

Florida: The deadline to register in person, by mail or online is Oct. 9.

Georgia: The deadline to register in person, by mail or online is Oct. 9.

Hawaii: The deadline to register in person, by mail or online is Oct. 9. Residents who miss the deadline can still register to vote and cast a ballot during early voting or on Election Day.

Idaho: Residents can register in person up to Election Day. The deadline to register by mail or online is Oct. 12.

Illinois: The deadline to register in person is Oct. 9. The deadline to register online is Oct. 21. After that, residents can register and vote at a local election office during a “grace period.”

Indiana: The deadline to register in person, by mail or online is Oct. 9.

Iowa: The deadline to register online is Oct. 27, and by mail is Oct. 22. Residents can register and vote in person on Election Day.

Kansas: The deadline to register in person, online or by mail is Oct. 16.

Kentucky: The deadline to register in person, online or by mail is Oct. 9.

Louisiana: The deadline to register in person or by mail is Oct. 9. Residents can register online until Oct. 16.

Maine: The deadline to register by mail is Oct. 16. Residents can register to vote in person until Election Day. Maine does not have online registration.

Maryland: The deadline to register in person is Oct. 16 or during early voting with a state-issued ID. The deadline to register by mail or online is Oct. 16.

Massachusetts: The deadline to register in person or online is Oct. 17. The deadline to register by mail is Oct. 16.

Michigan: The deadline to register in person or by mail is Oct. 9. Online voter registration is not available.

Minnesota: The deadline to register online or by mail is Oct. 16. Residents can register in person until Election Day.

Mississippi: The deadline to register in person is Oct. 8. If registering by mail, the deadline is Oct. 9. There is no online voting registration.

Missouri: The deadline to register by mail, in person or online is Oct. 10.

Montana: The deadline to register in person is Oct. 7. To register by mail, the form must be received by Oct. 10. After that, late registration is available through Election Day at county election offices. Online registration is not available.

Nebraska: The deadline to register by mail or online is Oct. 19. Residents can register in person up to Oct. 26.

Nevada: The deadline to register by mail is Oct. 9, and Oct. 16 in person. Residents can register online by Oct. 18.

New Hampshire: The deadline to register in person is on Election Day. To register by mail, the form must be received by Oct. 27. Residents cannot register online.

New Jersey: The deadline to register in person or by mail is Oct. 16. There is no online registration.

New Mexico: The deadline to register in person, by mail or online is Oct. 9.

New York: The deadline to register in person or online is Oct. 12. To register by mail, the form must be received by Oct. 17.

North Carolina: The deadline to register in person or by mail is Oct. 12. (Extended to Oct. 15 for 28 counties that were affected by Hurricane Florence.) From Oct. 17 to Nov. 3, residents can register and vote simultaneously at “one-stop” early voting sites. Residents cannot register online.

North Dakota: Voters are not required to register before Election Day, but must bring acceptable proof of ID and residency to the polls.

Ohio: The deadline to register in person, by mail or online is Oct. 9.

Oklahoma: The deadline to register in person or by mail is Oct. 12. Online registration is not available.

Oregon: The deadline to register in person, by mail or online is Oct. 16. Many of the state’s residents are automatically registered when they renew their driver’s licenses.

Pennsylvania: The deadline to register in person, online or by mail is Oct. 9.

Rhode Island: The deadline to register in person, by mail or online is Oct. 7.

South Carolina: The deadline to register in person, by mail or online is Oct. 17. (The deadline was extended 10 days from Oct. 7 because of Hurricane Florence.)

South Dakota: The deadline to register in person is Oct. 22. To register by mail, the form must be received by Oct. 22. Online registration is not available.

Tennessee: The deadline to register in person, by mail or online is Oct. 9.

Texas: The deadline to register in person or by mail is Oct. 9.

Utah: The deadline to register by mail is Oct. 9. The deadline to register in person or online is Oct. 30.

Vermont: Voters can register online or in person through Election Day.

Virginia: The deadline to register in person, online or by mail is Oct. 15.

Washington: The deadline to register online or by mail is Oct. 8. Residents can register in person by Oct. 29.

West Virginia: The deadline to register in person, online or by mail is Oct. 16.

Wisconsin: The deadline to register online or by mail is Oct. 17. Residents can register in person up until Election Day.

Wyoming: The deadline to register in person is on Election Day. To register by mail, the form must be received by Oct. 22. Online registration is not available.
Stay focused, get your friends registered and make a party plan to go vote, ignore the noise and polls and vote like your rights depend on it! Don't waste your time fighting trolls, bots & morans. Let's win this!!
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


Photo: Merry Christmas from the titular Mama June. Santa (aka Sugar Bear) and her lovely family!
Hey! Don't miss The Fogbow's Favorite TV Show starring the titular Mama June Shannon -- "Mama June: From Not To Hot!"

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 23949
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#8

Post by Volkonski » Sun Oct 07, 2018 6:02 pm


ABC News

Verified account

@ABC
Following Following @ABC
More
Demonstrators could be seen blocking traffic on a bridge in Austin, Texas on Saturday, snarling traffic as they protested against Judge Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation to the Supreme Court. https://abcn.ws/2PjaR6B


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
Suranis
Posts: 17049
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2010 7:04 am

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#9

Post by Suranis » Sun Oct 07, 2018 6:44 pm

https://twitter.com/jonfavs/status/1048721051125874688
Jon Favreau
‏Verified account @jonfavs

Advice I’ll try my best to follow: do yourself a favor and skip the beltway’s post-game analysis of the Kavanaugh fight. It’ll only make you feel worse. Lots of brilliant, thoughtful writers and takes out there. Lots of doors to knock and calls to make and voters to register.


Learn to Swear in Latin. Profanity with class!
https://blogs.transparent.com/latin/lat ... -in-latin/

User avatar
Foggy
Posts: 29145
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2009 12:00 pm
Location: Fogbow HQ
Occupation: Dick Tater

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#10

Post by Foggy » Mon Oct 08, 2018 6:56 am

I have been fighting despair for the past week or so, since I realized that the Senate was going to ignore Christine Blasey Ford and put a rapist on the Supreme Court. It's depressing as hell, I know. :madguy:

But the key is to fight the despair, and I do mean fight. The way to do that is:

1) do something else. I can't read Facebook or the news ... or even Fogbow sometimes. If I see Kavanaugh's face one more time, I hope it's on an airplane and he's sitting in first class, in which case I will loudly say "Oh, there's the piece of dog shit they put on the Supreme Court." A feller can dream, anyway. :daydream:

II. DO something else. Find an activity that will take your mind off the fact that things are bad now.

c. Remember that in the long run, history only moves in one direction, and that's forward. Things are not as bad as they seem, and they WILL get better. I have two books for you:
  • The Optimistic Leftist, by Ruy Teixeira <-this will cheer you up
  • Factfulness, by Hans Rosling <-this will surprise you, how well the world is really doing
  • ... OK, and if you like those, Building the New American Economy by Jeffrey Sachs <-a program for the future of America
Personally, I'm working out three times a week at O2 Fitness using Les Mills' Body Pump. My class today starts at noon. For those who knew me when I was in the Y-Guides and Princesses program with my kids, back then my Indian name was Tricky Bear, because I know ALL the tricks. But my new Indian name is Dances With Barbells. 8-) Then I have my screen name, Foggy, and ... and ... dagnabbit, I know I had a real name around here somewhere. :think:

At the same time, I'm getting ready for my main act prior to the midterms, which is that Thursday the NC State Fair starts, and I'm in charge of the booth for the NC Democratic Party. I'm going to be talking to literally thousands of voters over the following 11 days, and I probably won't be on Fogbow much.

And I'm just going to have faith in the Blue Tsunami. I can feel it, Dave. I can feel it.

If you're struggling, like I have been, I suggest you go forth and FIGHT.

:resist:


When reality is outlawed only outlaws will have reality.

User avatar
Lani
Posts: 4908
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 4:01 pm
Location: Some island in the Pacific

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#11

Post by Lani » Mon Oct 08, 2018 8:03 am

Yes, Foggy. Take steps forward. I feel very shattered over the last several days, but I know the way forward is to do what you can. So when people approach me about sexual assault, I tell my story. When people complain about Mazie Hirono, I tell them about how we worked together to fund internships for young adults with disabilities. We need to keep putting one foot in front of the other. Keep on marching!


Insert signature here: ____________________________________________________

User avatar
Mikedunford
Posts: 10462
Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2010 9:42 pm

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#12

Post by Mikedunford » Mon Oct 08, 2018 8:37 am

I love Mazie Hirono about 90% of the time, maybe more. I didn't hate her on Kavanaugh, and I think I understood what she was trying to say, but it might have been more helpful if she had chosen her words with a bit more care.

But that's in the past. Foggy's right; it's time to fight - not just fight, brawl.


"I don't give a fuck whether we're peers or not."
--Lord Thomas Henry Bingham to Boris Johnson, on being asked whether he would miss being in "the best club in London" if the Law Lords moved from Parliament to a Supreme Court.

User avatar
Mikedunford
Posts: 10462
Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2010 9:42 pm

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#13

Post by Mikedunford » Mon Oct 08, 2018 8:38 am

It also occurs to me that it's possible to see "when they kick you in the crotch, shoot them between the eyes" as a variant of "when they go low, we go high."


"I don't give a fuck whether we're peers or not."
--Lord Thomas Henry Bingham to Boris Johnson, on being asked whether he would miss being in "the best club in London" if the Law Lords moved from Parliament to a Supreme Court.

User avatar
RVInit
Posts: 8346
Joined: Sat Mar 05, 2016 4:31 pm

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#14

Post by RVInit » Mon Oct 08, 2018 10:25 am

The actual mob boss of this nation is accusing Democrats of acting like a mob. Of course, CNN is doing their work for them, just like "her emails" they can't stop fucking giving legs to the story. I can't freakin' stand CNN sometimes. This is one of their worst habits. Taking a Republican talking point and blowing up and making it the story for fucking months. Sigh.


"I know that human being and fish can coexist peacefully"
--- George W Bush

ImageImage

Somerset
Posts: 4339
Joined: Sat Aug 08, 2009 5:52 am
Location: Silicon Valley
Occupation: Lab rat

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#15

Post by Somerset » Mon Oct 08, 2018 11:40 am

Mikedunford wrote:
Mon Oct 08, 2018 8:38 am
It also occurs to me that it's possible to see "when they kick you in the crotch, shoot them between the eyes" as a variant of "when they go low, we go high."
:thumbs:



User avatar
Orlylicious
Posts: 10453
Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2012 4:02 pm
Location: With Pete Buttigieg and the other "open and defiant homosexuals" --Bryan Fischer AFA
Occupation: "Do Nothing Democrat Savage" -- Donald, 9/28/19 and "Scalawag...Part of an extreme, malicious leftist internet social mob working in concert with weaponized, socialized governments to target and injure political opponents.” -- Walt Fitzpatrick

Re: Kavanaugh Aftermath -- What Will Happen with Early Voting and the Midterms?

#16

Post by Orlylicious » Tue Oct 09, 2018 11:20 pm

Charlie Cook's take today:
The Real Blue Wave Could Come in the States
Charles E. Cook, Jr. October 9, 2018
***
This is all part of a broad theme that this year, the House, governor, and state legislature fights are taking place on one battlefield, while the U.S. Senate is being fought over on another. The House looks very likely to flip into Democratic hands, most likely a net gain for Democrats of between 25 and 45 seats, more than the 23 needed to tip the majority. But the Senate fight is mostly being fought in higher-elevation states that are mostly, if not entirely out of reach for a Democratic wave.

I expect net gains for Democrats in governorships of between six and a dozen, and a pickup for Democrats of between 400 and 650 state legislative seats, more than the average midterm loss of 375 seats for the party in the White House. These state elections are the most under-reported story in politics, with control of chambers likely tipping from Republicans to Democrats. Three-quarters of the governorships and four-fifths of the state legislative seats are up in these midterm cycles. Remember that with the inability or unwillingness of Washington to deal with so many problems, the resulting vacuum has given states considerably more power on many fronts. Then consider the massive gains on the state level for Republicans during the eight years of the Obama presidency, and how much of that ground could slip away.

Republicans now hold 33 governorships to just 16 for Democrats (plus one independent in Alaska). The GOP has 26 governorships up this year, Democrats only have nine. Republicans have 12 open governorships, Democrats only four. Republicans have 11 governorships that The Cook Political Report rates as Toss-Up or worse for the GOP, Democrats have one. The governorship of Illinois looks gone for Republicans, Michigan looks like it is slipping away from the GOP, while Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Ohio, and Wisconsin look headed in a similar direction.

Republicans control both the state Senate and House chambers in 25 states, Democrats hold both bodies in just seven states, 17 are split (plus Nebraska is both unicameral and non-partisan). The Republican dominance on the state level, much of it gained in the 2010 and 2014 midterm elections, has resulted in very conservative policy changes on issues ranging from abortion, to Medicaid expansion (or contraction), to voting access. Given that the U.S. Senate and House are likely to be closely divided no matter what happens in November and President Trump will still wield a veto pen, it is in the state capitols that major policy changes could occur in 2019 and 2020, not in Washington.
https://www.cookpolitical.com/analysis/ ... ome-states


:boxing: :boxing: :boxing:


Photo: Merry Christmas from the titular Mama June. Santa (aka Sugar Bear) and her lovely family!
Hey! Don't miss The Fogbow's Favorite TV Show starring the titular Mama June Shannon -- "Mama June: From Not To Hot!"

Post Reply

Return to “Brett Kavanaugh - Nomination for Supreme Court”