Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

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pipistrelle
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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#26

Post by pipistrelle »

ZekeB wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 7:59 am
Foggy wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 7:28 am
IMHO, Biden and Sanders are the two candidates who could not beat Trump.

Why would people vote for a 20th century candidate? They won't.
They'd rather vote for the 19th century candidate, Trump?
Apparently.

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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#27

Post by Foggy »

Read Addie's link:
Addie wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 4:29 am
Salon: There is hard data that shows that a centrist Democrat would be a losing candidate

Economist Thomas Piketty wrote a paper about this in 2018, though the Democrats paid no attention
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p0rtia
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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#28

Post by p0rtia »

:yeah:

Following the polls is, IMO, idiotic. It will only plunge us further to the autocratic, racist right. We need people to lead. Lead, and the fucking polls will follow. MOO
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Addie
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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#29

Post by Addie »

Politico: We talked to experts on aging about the 2020 field. Here’s what they told us.

One medical expert says Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Donald Trump are part of the population known as 'superagers.'

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pipistrelle
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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#30

Post by pipistrelle »

Trump’s brain is not remaining sharp into his 80s. Substitute Pelosi.

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Addie
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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#31

Post by Addie »

Vox: The growing narrative around Joe Biden’s gaffes, explained

Biden’s gaffes are being seen through a new lens: his age.

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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#32

Post by Addie »

Associated Press: Too old for president? Health and fitness a better question
New York Daily News OpEd- Richard Cohen: A lament for Joe Biden

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Slim Cognito
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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#33

Post by Slim Cognito »

Addie wrote:
Sun Sep 01, 2019 11:08 am
Associated Press: Too old for president? Health and fitness a better question
Biden has always been a walking gaffe machine. Now that he's the front-runner, it's more obvious than before, but probably not much worse than before.

Any hypocrite who supports hoof-in-mouth trump, but says Biden's gaffes disqualify him, can kiss my ass.
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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#34

Post by Sterngard Friegen »

Slim Cognito wrote:
Sun Sep 01, 2019 12:02 pm
Addie wrote:
Sun Sep 01, 2019 11:08 am
Associated Press: Too old for president? Health and fitness a better question
Biden has always been a walking gaffe machine. Now that he's the front-runner, it's more obvious than before, but probably not much worse than before.

Any hypocrite who supports hoof-in-mouth trump, but says Biden's gaffes disqualify him, can kiss my ass.
:like:

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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#35

Post by Addie »

Associated Press
Jimmy Carter on presidency: 'I hope there is an age limit'

ATLANTA, Ga. — Weeks shy of his 95th birthday, former President Jimmy Carter said Tuesday he doesn't believe he could have managed the most powerful office in the world at 80 years old.

Carter, who earlier this year became the longest-lived chief executive in American history, didn't tie his comments to any of his fellow Democrats running for president, but two leading 2020 candidates, Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders, would turn 80 during their terms if elected. ...

"I hope there's an age limit," Carter said with a laugh as he answered audience questions during his annual report at the Carter Center in Atlanta. "If I were just 80 years old, if I was 15 years younger, I don't believe I could undertake the duties I experienced when I was president."

Carter's observation came in response to a jovial inquiry about whether he had considered running in 2020 since he's still constitutionally allowed another term. The 39th president left office in 1981 at the age of 56 after losing his reelection bid to Ronald Reagan, who served two terms and left office as the oldest sitting president in history, at 77.

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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#36

Post by Addie »

Roll Call: Joe Biden is old. Who cares?

Certainly not voters over 65, who were key to the Democrats’ midterm success

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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#37

Post by ZekeB »

All I know is that our current president has lost his marbles. That happens at different ages for different people. Trump has no management or leadership skills, but I don't think he has ever had any.
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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#38

Post by Suranis »

Trump is no more a Superager than I am popular.
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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#39

Post by Sam the Centipede »

It's a little surprising that the birthers never suggested that Barack Obama might have been too old for the presidency as they managed to accuse him of every other possible fault they could imagine!

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Addie
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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#40

Post by Addie »

New York Times
Is Age Only a Number, Even When You’re Running for President?

The top three Democratic candidates are 78, 76 and 70 years old and one of them, Bernie Sanders, went to the hospital with chest pain. Voters want experienced leaders, but exactly how much life experience do they want?


For months, Democrats have watched as a trio of septuagenarians commanded a majority of support in their crowded primary field: Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., 76, Senator Elizabeth Warren, 70, and Mr. Sanders, have consistently led in the contest to face President Trump, 73, next year.

Presidential campaigns always reflect the hopes and fears — or, as political strategists call them, the “kitchen table conversations” — of the voters who cast the ballots. And this year, along with health care costs and college affordability, stagnant wages and immigration, the contest also reflects another issue, one that strikes at the heart of a country where the highest share of the electorate will be older than 65 since at least 1970: How old is too old?

Voters, who have watched candidates through debate stages and state party dinners, on sweaty stages and speed-walking across the state fair, corn dog in hand, do not generally want to say there is a ceiling. No one is too old to be doing this. They just are not sure they would want to be keeping up such a rigorous schedule in their 70s. Would you?

Gerontologists and other experts in aging say there is simply no way to definitively address the question of an upper age limit on the rigors of the presidency. ...

The averages paint a sobering picture: The average life expectancy in the United States is just under 79, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Even as Americans live longer than ever before, about 85 percent of older adults have at least one chronic disease, and more than three-quarters have at least two. ...

“The yardstick gets moved every decade because the country is aging and medical care becomes better,” he said. “Age should not be a disqualification for the presidency.”

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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#41

Post by Addie »

Politico Mag - Michael Kruse
Joe Biden’s Race Against Time

The former vice president’s most formidable opponent is not another Democrat. It’s our idea of what it means to be old. ...


URBANDALE, Iowa—One scorching, airless early evening in the middle of August, on the outskirts of Des Moines here at a place called Living History Farms, Joe Biden stood in front of an old yellow barn and talked to a couple hundred people about the past.

“I think that, uh, the behavior of this administration has awakened, uh, a whole new generation to get engaged in ways that they may not have gotten before,” Biden said, referring to President Donald Trump and the current tumult. “Just like in my generation, when I got out of school that, uh, when Bobby Kennedy and Dr. King had been assassinated in the ‘70s, uh, late seven—when I got engaged, um, you know, up to that time, remember the, none of you women will know this, but a couple men may remember, that was a time in the early, late ‘60s, and the early ‘60s and ‘60s, where it was drop out and go to Haight-Ashbury, don’t get engaged, don’t trust anybody over 30. I mean, for real. What happened to them, by the, by the early ‘70s, the late ‘60s, there was a whole generation that said, ‘Enough.’ The war in Vietnam was under way, and it was—a lot of you served in that war—and, uh, we were fighting like the devil to make sure that there was something dealing with cleaning up the environment, which was only beginning. We were in a position where the women’s movement was just beginning to move. We should have, by now, long before, passed the ERA amendment, but that was another issue …”

Sticky-squeezed into plastic chairs, the torpid crowd used handed-out campaign paraphernalia to fan their sweaty faces. But at this mention of the equal rights amendment, somebody started to clap, and others followed suit, and the smattering of applause felt like an act of mercy—giving the characteristically discursive Biden a chance to reset and everybody else the opportunity to take a breath and maybe not think too hard about the fact that the former vice president had bungled by a decade the dates of two of the most jarring and consequential killings in modern American history. ...

It’s an issue because of the simple math: Only three presidents have served in their 70s—Trump, Ronald Reagan and Dwight Eisenhower—and no president ever has finished a term at the age Biden would begin his. It’s an issue because of things Biden has said and done—suggesting, for instance, he thought he was in Vermont when he actually was in New Hampshire, dropping that wince-worthy phrase that his “time is up” in the first debate and oddly invoking a record player in the last debate. His lifelong habit of flubs, gaffes and often garbled speaking now can seem less like “Joe being Joe” and more like an ominous indicator of a creeping loss of mental acuity.

It’s an issue because Biden himself has tried in sometimes awkward ways to keep it from being one, inviting a heckler to run with him during a parade and challenging a reporter to a wrestling match. And it’s an issue because opponents, from Trump (“Sleepy Joe”) to those in his own party trying to knock him off, have made it an issue—from Eric Swalwell saying it was time to “pass the torch” to Tim Ryan saying he’s “declining” to Julian Castro (dubiously) accusing him of “forgetting” things to Cory Booker dishing out readymade Republican attack ad fodder by bluntly declaring on CNN that “there’s a lot of people who are concerned about Joe Biden’s ability to carry the ball all the way across the end line without fumbling” and “there are definitely moments where you listen to Joe Biden and you just wonder.” Even the famously gracious Jimmy Carter, who just turned 95, delivered a candid if unhelpful assessment last month when he said he didn’t believe he could have handled “the duties that I experienced when I was president” if he had been 80.

This isn’t just about Biden’s age—it’s about ours, and the tension between a vast cohort of Baby Boomers who have trained themselves to believe they’re only as old as they feel and a couple of impatient generations lined up behind them, wondering when they’re going to get a chance to take over. ...

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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#42

Post by Addie »

Politico - Ben White
How the baby boomers broke America

The most likely outcome in 2020 is that voters will yet again ask a baby boomer to fix what the baby boom broke.


The U.S. 2020 election — barring a shocker — offers a strong chance of producing a president in their 70s.

American voters face leading candidates who are another septuagenarian baby boomer whose vision for America is to go back to the so-called glory days (Donald Trump), go back to boring (Joe Biden) or radically reshape America by spending trillions upon trillions of dollars (Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders) the U.S. may not really have.

And the strangest bit is that each of these front-runners, even with radically different approaches, is promising to somehow address massive structural problems that their own generation — the enormous baby boom — largely created during a three-decade run dominating American political life.

The offering includes outliers like Pete Buttigieg, the millennial South Bend, Ind. mayor running openly on generational change. But the most likely outcome as it stands now is that the nation will yet again ask a baby boomer to fix what the baby boom broke. And it’s a lot to fix.

“We have Social Security. We have the national debt. We have what’s called ‘deferred maintenance’ in infrastructure. And of course we have the climate,” Bruce Gibney, author of “A Generation of Sociopaths,” said in the first episode of “Baby Bust,” the new POLITICO Money podcast series on the political and financial legacy of the baby boom generation. “I think the main impediment right now is the death grip the boomers have had over the political system.”

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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#43

Post by ZekeB »

Speaking of national debt, I saw it reported yesterday that it's at a seven year high and climbing. Those clever Republicans and their tax schemes. Low unemployment with additional taxed wages was supposed to offset the tax breaks.
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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#44

Post by Lani »

Don't worry. The repugs will fix it. Just slash Medicare, Social Security, housing vouchers, WIC, food stamps and unemployment compensation. Problem solved!
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Re: Issues 2020: Can a president be too old?

#45

Post by NMgirl »

Lani wrote:
Sun Oct 27, 2019 10:15 pm
Don't worry. The repugs will fix it. Just slash Medicare, Social Security, housing vouchers, WIC, food stamps and unemployment compensation. Problem solved!
And for god's sake, lower taxes on the rich! That always works, as we know.

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